JEFF the Brotherhood

JEFF the Brotherhood (11:00 PM)

Bully (10:00 PM)

The Lovely Bad Things (9:00 PM)

Fri, March 27, 2015

8:00 pm

Adv Tix $15.00 / Day of Show Tix $17.00

This event is all ages

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JEFF the Brotherhood - (Set time: 11:00 PM)
JEFF the Brotherhood
“We’re more proud of this record than any record we’ve made before,” enthuses singer/guitarist Jake Orrall about Wasted On The Dream, the righteous new album from Nashville rockers JEFF The Brotherhood. “It’s the most time we’ve ever spent writing songs, the most time we’ve ever spent in the studio, and it’s definitely the most fully realized JEFF The Brotherhood record we’ve ever made.” “Jake and I wanted to make a really fun rock album that could reach a lot of different people,” adds drummer Jamin Orrall. “And we’ve succeeded”

Wasted On The Dream is the record the Orrall brothers been building up to since they first formed JEFF The Brotherhood in 2001. It’s a van-rocking, bong-rattling slab that authentically captures their fiery mixture of 70s hard rock, 80s punk, 90’s grunge and indelible pop melodies. “People like to lump us in with the garage thing, because there aren’t any other heavy rock bands that are playing the circuit that we’re playing,” says Jake. “But we’re not interested in playing three-chord punk or blues songs; we play hard rock, and we’re all about the pop hook. Bands like Foo Fighters, Weezer and Queens of the Stone Age — that’s who we aspire to be”

Co-produced by JEFF The Brotherhood with Joe Chiccarelli (The Shins, My Morning Jacket, Manchester Orchestra), tracks like “Voyage Into Dreams,” “Melting Place” and “Karaoke, TN” are loaded with muscular guitars, pounding drums, sky-punching riffs and effortlessly catchy choruses. “We envisioned something similar to a lot of the rock records that came out in the Nineties,” explains Jamin, “back when rock records were still really big, and bands like Smashing Pumpkins and Nirvana were playing arenas.”

While Jake’s three-string guitar and Jamin’s minimalist drum kit used to define the band’s sound, Wasted on the Dream is the first JEFF album to showcase their recent evolution into a fully realized rock outfit: Jake plays six-string guitar, Jamin plays a full kit, and Jack Lawrence (of Raconteurs and Greenhornes fame) plays bass on the entire album. Wasted On The Dream mirrors the awesome power of the bands live shows, which now feature a full-time touring guitarist and bassist in addition to the Orrall brothers. “We did the two-piece thing for twelve years and became really bored with it,” Jake laughs. “We thought, ‘we need to get some more people to play with us, because we’re about to kill each other!’ I’m sure we will perform some of the two-piece stuff again in the future, because the two of us are the band; we can always do that. But everyone who sees us now says we’re at our best and this is the best we’ve ever sounded, in this current incarnation.”

In addition to Lawrence, Wasted On The Dream features guest contributions from Bethany Cosentino of Best Coast, who sings on “In My Dreams,” plus Diarrhea Planet guitarists, Evan Bird and Emmett Miller (“They play this insane Scorpions-vibe shredder solo on ‘What’s a Creep,’” says Jake) — and, best of all, Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull, who delivers a truly Tull-riffic flute solo on “Black Cherry Pie”.

Wasted On The Dream also showcases the band’s sharpest songwriting to date, a development that Jake and Jamin partly chalk up to Chiccarelli’s sage guidance. “I wrote 35 songs for the record, and we wound up recording 11 of them,” says Jake. “We’d be working up a song in the studio, and Joe would be like, ‘Hey, do you have a bridge from another song that you’re not using that would go good in this song?’ I’d never even thought about doing something like that before, and it totally worked out! I learned so much from him about song structure, and about what resonates with people in terms of pop songs, melodies, production values, all of that.” “He made our sound much bigger,” adds Jamin. “He’s kind of a freak when it comes to drums; he’s very, very meticulous about drum sounds, and we spent a lot of time getting them just right.”

Jake and Jamin have toured and recorded relentlessly ever since JEFF The Brotherhood began, releasing seven studio albums (including 2012’s Dan Auerbach-produced Hypnotic Nights), a live record and a large stack of singles and EPs, and building up a rabid cult following in the process. But with Wasted On The Dream, JEFF The Brotherhood have come up with a potent record that will tickle the fancy (and eardrums) of a much larger audience while still bringing their loyal fans along for a raucous ride.

“We did it by ourselves for so long, playing basement shows and putting out our own records, so people think of us as punk or garage or lo-fi, or whatever,” reflects Jamin. “But we were only doing that stuff because we didn’t have any other options. And now, we have all these opportunities to play bigger places, and we actually have a budget for an album…”

“Oh yeah,” says Jake. “Now we’re definitely taking this…to the next level”
Bully - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Bully
Bully is a young Nashville four-piece blasting out of the gates with high-powered grunge punk reminiscent of the beginnings of indie rock. The band is fronted by Alicia Bognanno, an audio engineer who has been cutting her teeth on the soundboards of indie clubs and studios in recent years. After opening for the likes of Best Coast, Those Darlins, and Superchunk, Bully is ready to grab their own audience.

The dynamic melodies and high-speed percussion section help Bully cut through the noise quickly and repeatedly. Tracks like “Milkman” and “Brainfreeze” lay it all on the line with scrappy energy until the last crunchy bass note fades out.
The Lovely Bad Things - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
The Lovely Bad Things
Brought together by time and fate—they'd all known each other since high school, but finally made a band together in 2009—and named by some kind of esoteric computer filename error too complex to further explain, Orange County's The Lovely Bad Things are the hyperactive omnitalented and relentlessly hilarious garage-pop band who crowdfunded their way to an encore performance at the world-famous Primavera Sound festival and whose new album The Late Great Whatever was titled during a dream at the suggestion of their spirit guide, who happens to look strangely like Dinosaur Jr drummer Murph. Was that a lot to take in all at once? Then now you can sympathize with the cop who pulled them over on their way to the UFO museum in Roswell, New Mexico: "'Who here has ADD?'" Brayden Ward remembers him asking. "And we all raised our hands."

The Lovely Bad Things are Brayden and brother Camron Ward, Tim Hatch and Lauren Curtius, each a multi-instrumentalist and each devoted to a bottomless knowledge of ridiculous pop culture and comprehensive appreciation for the Pixies, though if you dismantled their songs and their record collections both you'd find Sonic Youth, Modest Mouse, the B-52s, the Wipers and of course Redd Kross, whose sense of humor and sense for a hook the Bad Things have inherited. They mostly come from the city of La Mirada, but their true home is the Lovely Bad Pad, a converted suburban garage—converted personally by the band members—that's hosted truly legendary backyard punk shows, up to and including a surprise set by Peter, Bjorn and John, who know a good thing when they hear it.

It's this combination of D.I.Y. spirit and off-the-wall luck that carried The Lovely Bad Things from that backyard to a cassette release on trendsetter label Burger Records that would be called one of the best L.A. punk releases of 2011 by the L.A. Weekly. And from there they ricocheted into a surprise slot at Primavera Sound festival, crowdfunding and benefit-showing just barely enough for airfare to get there and winning over their audience forever once they did. Now, after building a fan base show by show and person by frothing-at-the-mouth person—a guy once came all the way from Belgium to see them play one special song—The Lovely Bad Things have finished The Late Great Whatever for Volcom Entertainment.

The Late Great Whatever was started just after the release of the maxi-EP New Ghost/Old Waves, until now the Lovely Bad Things' signature release. Although they'd released a full-length called Shark Week in 2010, the album that would become …Whatever was going to be something new, they explain: "Our first real full-length," says Tim. At least half of Shark Week's songs were written in … oh, about two minutes, calculates Lauren, because back then Lovely Bad Things were just discovering the knockout sugar high that came from just playing music with each other. But this would be different: "How do I say it and not sound like a super-cliché musician?" asks Camron. "More mature, I guess?"

So what's that mean? Not one but two Star Wars references on the tracklist, Bigfoot on the cover, a shout-out to Macho Man Randy Savage and a relentless collection of the strongest songs The Lovely Bad Things have ever done. What, did you think "mature" meant? They were going to get all mopey and slow? ("Just say it's 'globular' and 'shapeshifting,'" suggests Camron.) Produced by Jon Gilbert in the studio built and run by Crystal Antlers' frontman Jonny Bell, this is a record by a band who've developed a telepathic language of their own, with songs that stop and start and turn inside out in ways you just can't play unless you know exactly what everyone else in the studio with you is thinking.

On The Late Great Whatever, Lovely Bad Things roll out just about anything you'd want about 15% faster than you'd expect. Do they do it all? They indeed do it all. They have stormers like "Kessel Run" and the stand-out "Randall the Savage," which is all jittery post-punky guitar and gradually building insanity. Then they have sweetheart pop-punk like "Maybe I Know," which is born for the best mixtapes of 2013. They have surf's-up guitar ("Styx And Branches") and wah-wah guitar ("Oozin It") and oh-my-God-I'm-being-attacked-by-furious-bees guitar ("Kessel Run"). They have Frank Black-style spoken-word stammer ("Fried Eyes") and cooled-out Kim Deal back-ups. And those heartbreaker harmonies that are part of what make The Lovely Bad Things so special? Pretty much everywhere, thanks to Lauren's gift for melody, but why don't you go right to "Rope Swing" if you need 'em right away? And if this still seems like a lot to take in at once, don't worry—down some (or too much) caffeine, roll down the windows and let The Late Great Whatever take the wheel. Just watch out for the cops on the way to the UFO museum. When they hear music like this, they pay way too much attention.
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change