Halsey, Young Rising Sons

Halsey (9:25 PM)

Young Rising Sons (8:20 PM)

Olivver the Kid (7:35 PM)

flor (7:00 PM)

Wed, March 11, 2015

6:30 pm

$17.00 - $20.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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Halsey - (Set time: 9:25 PM)
Halsey
Halsey: a better combination of lovable pop and provacative grunge could not have been better engineered in a lab. The alter ego of 19-year-old Ashley Frangipane was conceived from the "Halsey" stop on the L train to Brooklyn (and is an anagram of her first name) -- appropriately so, having been born in New Jersey, but defined by the city of New York. Halsey seeks to combine honest, unashamed, and androgynous lyrics with the sugary feminine allure of pop music. Biracial and shaped by the discography of a black father and a white mother, she brings a sense of diversity and a realness to the pop idiom. Her sound is hook-bait-catchy, and unapologetic in nature. "Ghost," her lead single," is a perfect example: She plays no victim, instead exploiting the tragic and laughable intimacy of human relationships. Signed to Astralwerks/Capitol, Halsey has all the undeniable makings of a pop star, with a bitter aftertaste that is so tongue-in-cheek.
Young Rising Sons - (Set time: 8:20 PM)
Young Rising Sons
Fueled by a fierce chemistry and brother-like camaraderie, Red Bank, New Jersey-based foursome Young Rising Sons deliver anthemic alt-rock that's uplifting and infectious but unshakably honest. As heard on their debut single "High," lead singer/guitarist Andy Tongren, lead guitarist Dylan Scott, bassist Julian Dimagiba, and drummer Steve Patrick give serious depth to their stylish, summery sound through fearless recognition of life's less-than-sunny moments -- a dynamic that inspired SiriusXM Alt Nation and tastemakers across the globe to greet "High" with lavish praise and BBC Radio 1's Zane Lowe to name the song his "Next Hype" track upon its release last spring. With Tongren's voice showing a dizzying range and undeniable sweetness, Young Rising Sons' upcoming self-titled debut EP channels that spirit into songs marked by both supremely melodic hooks and a rare soulful intensity.

"Young Rising Sons" builds off the band's pop-perfect sense of songcraft with left-of-center touches like fuzzed-out basslines and deep electro beats. A blissed-out, whistle-laced track, "High" shows off Tongren's acrobatic vocal skills and gives a nod to the fact that, according to Scott, "as a band we were low for a long time, and now the highs are finally happening and it's a really cool feeling." Honoring Young Rising Sons' blue-collar background, songs like the piano-driven epic "Red and Gold" hone in on "that hunger to get where you want to be in life and knowing that you need to just grind it out and write your own destiny," as Tongren explains. The percussion driven, "King of the World" perfectly captures the joy and power of shaking off negativity, while the slow-burning "Turnin'" starts out tense and moody before bursting into its chorus and bridge's glorious gospel-esque harmonies.

Founded in 2010, Young Rising Sons came to be when Scott, Dimagiba, and Patrick (all New Jersey natives who had played music together throughout high school) saw Tongren performing an acoustic set at a New York City bar and approached him about singing for their newly formed band. "They asked me to jam with them and everything just clicked right away -- we were friends first and bandmates second," recalls Tongren, who grew up in Ohio and studied music at The New School. Bound by a love of melody-minded songwriters like Tom Petty and high-energy punk bands such as Green Day, Young Rising Sons struggled to find considerable success with their music over the next few years, but continued to push forward with their songwriting and playing. "We were really just going on faith and the fact that we're best friends and wanted to maintain that, regardless of whatever ended up happening with the band," notes Scott.

Then, in late 2013, mutual friends introduced Tongren to New York based producers Shep Goodman and Aaron Accetta, who were immediately floored by the scope of Tongren's voice and quickly got to know the entire band. "They all had such a great connection and we felt an instant chemistry with them too, so we started collaborating and guiding them to help take the band to the next level," says Goodman. "We love that they're making music that's got some heavy qualities to it, but in the end is so positive in a very real way," he adds. After signing with Dirty Canvas Music (Goodman and Accetta's New York-based production company) and recording a batch of new songs, Young Rising Sons released "High" along with an accompanying black-and-white, laid-back, sweetly playful video shot in their home turf of New Jersey. Following the post-"High" buzz, Young Rising Sons soon landed a deal with Interscope Records, then started working on their EP.

With plans of devoting the rest of the year to touring and creating their full-length debut, Young Rising Sons are continuing to come up with songs that expand their sound and mine their many eclectic influences. True to the band's brotherly vibe, Young Rising Sons take a decidedly collaborative approach to the songwriting process, with Tongren and Scott serving as the main melodists and lyricists but all four members contributing ideas. While that all-for-one-and-one-for-all mentality forms the core of the band, just as essential to Young Rising Sons is instilling their songs with a certain down-to-earth optimism. "We all got into music because of the way it makes us feel, so now that we're in the driver's seat we're going to try to make other people feel good and passionate," says Tongren. "We really believe in that give-and-take between us and the listener," he adds, "and we want to do what we can to help people harness that hopeful feeling and create something for themselves out of it."
Olivver the Kid - (Set time: 7:35 PM)
Olivver the Kid
flor - (Set time: 7:00 PM)
flor
With their nuanced songwriting and inventive sensibilities, flor use their songs to explore feelings of longing and heartache, anxiety and self-doubt. On their debut album come out, you’re hiding, singer/guitarist Zach Grace, bassist Dylan Bauld, guitarist McKinley Kitts, and drummer Kyle Hill alternately magnify and brighten those feelings by dreaming up an intensely cinematic take on synth-driven alt-pop. But for all its transportive melodies and triumphant mood, come out, you’re hiding was born from a place of painful vulnerability.
“Making this album has really been about me coming out my shell and getting over whatever block I have about letting people know what’s going on in my head,” says Grace, who serves as chief lyricist for the L.A.-based, Oregon-bred band. “A lot of people probably struggle with believing in themselves that way, and the album’s a testament to overcoming that.”
Mostly recorded in Bauld’s bedroom studio, with its title nodding to Grace’s reclusive tendencies, come out, you’re hiding achieves its intimate feel thanks partly to a process that flor adopted soon after moving to L.A. “I’d started experimenting with different production styles, and I ended up coming up with these sounds that weren’t anything like what we’d done before,” recalls Bauld, flor’s main producer. “Ever since then, I’ll make a basic track and take it to Dylan, and he’ll build it from there,” adds Grace. “Starting out on my own makes writing a little easier,” he continues. “I can get it all out in a very journal-like way, and then pull back and process things a bit before putting it all out into the world.”
Not only essential in instilling come out, you’re hiding with unfettered honesty, flor’s creative approach has shaped their singular sound. Mixed by Andrew Maury (Atlas Genius, Panama Wedding), come out, you’re hiding infuses its crystalline textures with the heavy guitars and fierce drumming that flor’s long brought to their live show. “We used to hold ourselves back and try to keep it simple, but now we’re doing whatever we can to make these big moments within our songs,” says Bauld, who’s also produced records for such artists as Halsey.
With its airy beats and soaring melodies, “Guarded” starts off come out, you’re hiding by offering a confession of insecurity. “‘Guarded’ is about building up this castle around me and having it torn down, and trying to deal with losing that feeling of comfort,” says Grace. On “Where Do You Go,” shimmering guitar tones match the song’s tender romanticism. “It’s about a couple with this unspeakable joy about them,” explains Grace. “It’s asking, ‘Where do you go to find love like that?’, because it’s so undeniably special.” Also on come out, you’re hiding, flor bring their dreamy introspection to songs like “Overbehind,” whose determined self-assurance makes for a sublimely uplifting closing track.
Growing up in the tiny town of Hood River, Grace, Bauld, and Kitts first created music together as teenagers. Once they’d brought Hill into the fold and begun making their name as a captivating live act, the band pushed forward in their career by relocating to L.A. Taking on the name flor—a word that translates to flower in Portuguese—the band soon landed a deal with Fueled by Ramen, who released their debut EP Sounds in February 2016.
Despite his initial shyness about sharing his lyrics on come out, you’re hiding, Grace says he’s ultimately emboldened by flor’s lavish arrangements. “As soon as my lyrics are in the songs and they’ve got that beautiful production on them, I love that people are learning who I am and what flor is about,” he notes. “Hopefully they’re finding something in it to make them feel some kind of companionship—like we’re all going through these things together.”
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change