Hurray For The Riff Raff

Hurray For The Riff Raff (10:00 PM)

Adia Victoria (9:15 PM)

Alana Amram (8:30 PM)

Thu, March 12, 2015

8:00 pm

$20.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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Hurray For The Riff Raff - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Hurray For The Riff Raff
Hurray For The Riff Raff is Alynda Lee Segarra, but in many ways it's much more than that: it's a young woman leaving her indelible stamp on the American folk tradition. If you're listening to her new album, 'Small Town Heroes,' odds are you're part of the riff raff, and these songs are for you.



"It's grown into this bigger idea of feeling like we really associate with the underdog," says Segarra, who came to international attention in 2012 with 'Look Out Mama.' The album earned her raves from NPR and the New York Times to Mojo and Paste, along with a breakout performance at the 2013 Newport Folk Festival, which left American Songwriter "awestruck" and solidified her place at the forefront of a new generation of young musicians celebrating and reimagining American roots music. "We really feel at home with a lot of worlds of people that don't really seem to fit together," she continues, "and we find a way to make them all hang out with our music. Whether it's the queer community or some freight train-riding kids or some older guys who love classic country, a lot of folks feel like mainstream culture isn’t directed at them. We're for those people."



Segarra, a 26-year-old of Puerto Rican descent whose slight frame belies her commanding voice, grew up in the Bronx, where she developed an early appreciation for doo-wop and Motown from the neighborhood's longtime residents. It was downtown, though, that she first felt like she found her people, traveling to the Lower East side every Saturday for punk matinees at ABC No Rio. "Those riot grrrl shows were a place where young girls could just hang out and not have to worry about feeling weird, like they didn’t belong," Segarra says of the inclusive atmosphere fostered by the musicians and outsider artists who populated the space. "It had such a good effect on me to go to those shows as a kid and feel like somebody in a band was looking out for me and wanted me to feel inspired and good about myself."



The Lower East Side also introduced her to travelers, and their stories of life on the road inspired her to strike out on her own at 17, first hitching her way to the west coast, then roaming the south before ultimately settling in New Orleans. There, she fell in with a band of fellow travelers, playing washboard and singing before eventually learning to play a banjo she'd been given in North Carolina. "It wasn't until I got to New Orleans that I realized playing music was even possible for me," she explains. "The travelers really taught me how to play and write songs, and we'd play on the street all day to make money, which is really good practice. You have to get pretty tough to do that, and you put a lot of time into it."



"The community I found in New Orleans was open and passionate. The young artists were really inspiring to me," she says. "Apathy wasn’t a part of that scene. And then the year after I first visited, Katrina happened, and I went back and saw the pain and hardship that all of the people who lived there had gone through. It made we want to straighten out my life and not wander so much. The city gave had given me an amazing gift with music, and it made me want to settle there and be a part of it and help however I could."



Many of the songs on 'Small Town Heroes' reflect that decision and her special reverence for the city. She bears witness to a wave of violence that struck the St. Roch neighborhood in the soulful "St. Roch Blues;" yearns for a night at BJ's Bar in the Bywater in "Crash on the Highway;" and sings of her home in the Lower Ninth Ward on "End of the Line." "That neighborhood and particularly the house I lived in there became the nucleus of a singer songwriter scene in New Orleans," she explains. "'End Of The Line' is my love song to that whole area and crew of people."



The scope of the album is much grander than just New Orleans, though, as Segarra mines the deep legacies and contemporizes the rich variety of musical forms of the American South for the age of Trayvon Martin and Wendy Davis. "Delia''s gone but I'm settling the score," she sings with resolute menace on "The Body Electric," a feminist reimagining of the traditional murder ballad form that calls on everything from Stagger Lee to Walt Whitman. She juxtaposes pure country pop with the dreams and nightmares that come with settling down with just one person in "I Know It's Wrong (But That's Alright)," while album opener "Blue Ridge Mountain" is an Appalachian nod to Maybelle Carter.



NPR has said that Hurray for the Riff Raff's music "sweeps across eras and genres with grace and grit," and that's never been more true than on 'Small Town Heroes.' These songs belong to no particular time or place, but rather to all of us. These songs are for the riff raff.
Adia Victoria - (Set time: 9:15 PM)
Adia Victoria
Ask Adia Victoria outright about her life and you'll be met with a few readied no-fluff bullet points: she's from South Carolina. She was raised seventh day Adventist. She started playing guitar at twenty one and she's never stopped moving. On the rare chance she divulges more, you'll quickly notice a common theme threading itself through her story--rivers.

"When I was 18, I stood on the bank of the Seine. I didn't have a friend in Paris and I thought about jumping in and letting the water take me where ever."

At nineteen she hovered above the East River, newly arrived in New York City, and whispered to the city "I'm gonna rule the world."

She will tell you at twenty three she saw the Chattahoochee swell up and swallow Sandy Springs. At eight years old the Pacolet River in her native Campobello washed away her black patent leather shoes.

Adia moved to Nashville in 2010 just after the Cumberland devastated the city's downtown and started moonlighting solo in clubs and bars around town. After three years of playing out between her school schedule and family life she formed a band with Ruby Rogers, Tiffany Minton and Mason Hickman to flesh out her primitive songs on misery, madness, hope beyond reason and the eponymous South.

"The one thing I like most about rivers is that they never stop to explain. They just keep moving"
Alana Amram - (Set time: 8:30 PM)
Alana Amram
Born in upstate New York, Amram toured around the country with her musical family, napping in guitar cases at the foot of the stage. As a teenager she collected LP's, penned zines and retreated to the clubs and D.I.Y. venues in New York City. After attending SUNY Purchase College to study filmmaking she left to pursue music as a bassist with various bands. From piles of poems and stories throughout those formative years, she began writing her own songs.

In 2008, she was signed to Zealous records and released a self titled E.P. 2010 she self- released a debut full length, Painted Lady. In 2011 Amram chose to pay tribute to 60's singer- songwriter VINCE MARTIN recording Snow Shadows: Songs of Vince Martin. Kingswood Records released the collection. It features string arrangements by Van Dyke Parks and John Sebastian of the Lovin' Spoonful's iconic harmonica. In early 2013 Kingswood Records released a SPLIT 7″ with Invisible Familiars featuring the track ″Motorbike.″

Recorded live in 2 days, her third full length, Spring River, was released in early 2014 on Kingswood. Amram relocated to Los Angeles. She has been touring the USA, EUROPE and the U.K. in support of the record.

Over the last decade she has opened, sang and played along side an endless array of great musicians, young and old and as varied as her musical taste. A short list includes: Pete Seeger, Peter Rowan, Steve Earle, Abigail Washburn, Judy Collins, Jimmy Dale Gilmore, Langhorne Slim, Nicole Atkins, Alberta Cross, Anti-Flag and Psychic TV. Her music has been featured in ads for Stetson, the web series ”The Actress" and in several independent films. Alana is also a filmmaker and most recently directed a short documentary called PORTAL TO POWER. She has played bass in Lights (Drag City), Cliffie Swan, Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black, The Fame and Blue Sparks.
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change