Hot Water Music

Hot Water Music (9:45 PM)

Dave Hause (8:45 PM)

The Flatliners (8:00 PM)

Sat, November 15, 2014

7:00 pm

$25.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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Hot Water Music - (Set time: 9:45 PM)
Hot Water Music
If you ask the members of Hot Water Music what it's like to be back, the musicians will tell you that it doesn't feel like they've gone anywhere. And it's understandable why: The rock foursome, which formed in 1993 in Gainesville, FL, has been a staple of the music scene for years. The band's new album, Exister, is their eighth in nearly two decades, yet another addition to an already impressive career.

But it's also understandable why fans see this album as a sudden return: The group, singer/guitarist Chris Wollard, bassist Jason Black, drummer George Rebelo and guitarist/vocalist Chuck Ragan, pressed pause in 2006, electing to pursue individual projects and live their lives for a while. In the long run, that break worked—two years later the four members reconvened to perform live, a few shows evolving into many.

The band's desire to pen a new album to succeed 2004's The New What Next rose directly from those live shows. "The more shows we did, the more we felt like a band," Chris says. "And what do bands do? They write songs. So it was only a matter of time before we started talking about it. The more we talked about it the more we got excited about the idea. A lot of the writing was based around what we wanted to play onstage. It was a natural progression from enjoying playing these shows to making another record."

Instead of plunging into writing an album, the four musicians first wrote and recorded a new seven-inch called "The Fire, The Steel, The Tread," which the band released on its own in August of 2011. Working on the two tracks that appear on that disc opened the floodgates and suddenly the members of Hot Water Music were writing together again, quite prolifically. It was around this time that the band signed with Rise Records, a label Chris says was "an obvious right choice for us."

This meant that a new album was definitely and finally happening, and the musicians, who now live in different parts of the country, wrote whenever they were together during the second half of 2011, testing out new material backstage and during soundchecks at shows. Jason and George spent time in Florida writing with Chris and later flew to California to write with Chuck. These sessions and the passing back and forth of demos was a new method for the band, but it was one that was ultimately to their benefit.

"It was a different approach for us," Jason notes. "But I think it worked out better in the long run. I think everyone got to write more and got more of their own voice. Once we started writing it just started going. And we probably could have kept going and going and going."

Instead Hot Water Music headed to Ft. Collins, CO in late January to record with Bill Stevenson and Jason Livermore at The Blasting Room, a decision that was enthusiastically unanimous. Hot Water Music spent 21 days in the studio, armed with 20 tracks that they pared down to the 13 that appear on the final album. The focus was on capturing their live energy in a recording, as well as crafting tracks they'd want to perform live. This resulted in Hot Water Music numbers that are, as Jason puts it, "faster, more direct and more aggressive." The process was void of conflict or hardship, the songs coming out in a surprisingly facile and streamlined manner.

"It was really a perfect experience," Chris says. "Having taken such a long break from our last record we didn't really know what we were walking into. But for everybody to come back together and have it go so smoothly without a hitch is really awesome. We needed somebody that understand how we were coming from a lot of different places and who could handle that. Bill did that and it really worked. Everyone was working for a common goal and heading toward a common vision."

The result of that vision both reflects back on Hot Water Music's extensive career and embraces a desire to move forward. The tracks on the disc are invigorated and propulsive, driven by a renewed sense of excitement and energy. The lead focus track "State of Grace" is what Jason describes as "three chords and the truth," showcasing the band's ability to successfully balance their formative punk-rock grit with an engagingly catchy melody. "Drag My Body," an early release from the album, reveals a similar sensibility, centered around an undeniable rock chorus ("There's a complexity in the nature of the music but it doesn't get in the way of the song," Jason notes of the track). The album is not so much a comeback as it is a new chapter, the next step for a quintessential rock band as their songwriting expands to encircle a broader audience.

"There was a certain kind of confidence when making it," Chris says. "The band wasn't second guessing anything. We weren't worrying about how it was going to be perceived. We just let it be and helped it be as good as it could be."

"I think George nailed it during the recording process when he said that it felt like making our first record again," Jason adds. "It's been so long. I don't think any of us cared what anyone thought about the record. When you're in the middle of being a band and you're making a new record it's really easy to get caught up in that idea of whether people are going to like it. We just didn't worry about it this time because it felt like we had a clean slate. And it came out really well because of that."
Dave Hause - (Set time: 8:45 PM)
Dave Hause
“The way we learned to live is fading fast/I guess we never bargained for a crash.”

For Dave Hause the American dream is a broken promise, a childhood ideal that has been shattered by the reality of the past two decades. On the musician’s second solo album, Devour, Hause scours the foundation of that crumbled dream in an attempt to discover how everything we believed growing up could have turned out so differently. The album, initially written to become the third record from Hause’s rock band The Loved Ones, follows his 2011 solo debut Resolutions, a disc that allowed the musician to understand his potential as his own artist.

As Hause, a Philadelphia native, began penning new music for a new album from The Loved Ones, it became clear that the group, who had taken a break after their second album, had stalled. These songs, however, which showcased a clear thematic journey, were meant to be vocalized by Hause and over the past few years he transformed them into Devour. Hause solidified the album’s sequence before even going into the studio, aiming to craft a narrative arc that drove the album from its dark, heavy first half into a lighter, more hopeful tone. A thematic line of melody runs through the songs, reflecting the overarching ideas in the music itself. The disc explores the heartbreak of shattered childhood promises of a better world and concludes with optimistic hope.

“Devour is about that inherent American appetite,” Hause says. “It’s in all the songs in some degree. There’s a reason why Tony Soprano became such a huge American icon – he’s this guy with this insane appetite for women and food and power. I think for the American public to latch onto a figure like that says something. Some of the positive things about America come from that as well, but there’s a real sense of reckoning that comes from devouring everything in front of you. Is it ever enough?”

The rock songs, tinged with folk and punk tones, are firmly rooted in Hause’s own upbringing and the sensibility that comes from growing up in a blue collar neighborhood driven by the lingering anticipation of upward mobility. In the lyrics, the fulcrum around which the album revolves, Hause grapples with this working class ideal and the fact that America’s recent shifts have caused it to no longer fit. From “The Great Depression,” which centers on the unfulfilled promises laid out in the Reagan-era ‘80s, to the more specific-minded relationships of “Father’s Son,” Devour comes to terms with the loss of youthful innocence in a rapidly evolving world.

“I wanted to shine a light back on what was going on,” Hause says. “It was a topic that was close to me and I wanted to write about it. In the end, it leaves you with the idea that if you have music and love you may be able to save yourself. It’s going to be alright. That simple John Lennon concept of all you need is love. That’s how I wrote myself out of the dark and the music begs the listener to come take that risk as well.”

Once Hause had the track sequence and overall narrative in place he enlisted producer Andrew Alekel along with musician and co-producer Mitchell Townsend. The producers helped Hause collect the right musicians to build the songs in the best way possible, including My Morning Jacket keyboardist Bo Koster, Social Distortion drummer David Hidalgo Jr. and bassist Bob Thomson. Frightened Rabbit’s Scott Hutchison, Alkaline Trio’s Matt Skiba and The Watson Twins also appear on several tracks. Hause and his crew recorded the album over several weeks from mid-February to mid-March at Grandmaster Recorders LTD. in Hollywood, CA, focusing on giving each song the right tone while maintaining an overall musical aesthetic that helps tie the lyrical themes together.

“It was this group effort,” Hause says. “A lot of trust went into letting Andrew and Mitch be the architects of the record. I trusted that we would get in there and they would know who was right for the music. They wanted to bring these people together in this great studio to get a record that was greater than the sum of its parts. I’m glad I trusted them because it was great to work with everyone there.”

For the musician, who has toured with Social Distortion, The Gaslight Anthem, Bouncing Souls and Chuck Ragan since launching his solo career, Devour is a cathartic release, both sonically and lyrically. Hause recently relocated to California and is committed to pursing the music he feels best reflects him individually. The journey on the album, the search for the light at the end of the tunnel, mirrors his own trek. The record closes with the delicate introspection of “Benediction,” a song that pulls lyrical lines from all the tracks that precede it. After all the ruined promises and the culminating disappointments of the world, Hause ends the album with the sentiment of possibility. “It’s love my friend in the end that can save us tonight,” he sings. “So are you in?”
The Flatliners - (Set time: 8:00 PM)
The Flatliners
The Flatliners were making music together before they were old enough to drive a car. Before they were old enough to buy alcohol they had already released two albums: 2005's Destroy to Create (Stomp Records) and their 2007 Fat Wreck debut The Great Awake. Since then this Toronto-based four piece have toured the world enough to make even the most road-savvy bands homesick.

With an impressive road resume that boasts tours along side punk icons like NOFX and Bad Religion, The Flatliners continue to mature and progress, an evolution obvious on their new Fat 7" Cynics. "We usually catch ourselves writing parts that may be a bit more challenging to play at first, but we're up to it. We're constantly trying to be better at our respective instruments and keep things interesting for ourselves. That's the fun part of writing your own songs. You can do whatever the hell you want." said singer Chris Cresswell. Recorded again by Steve Rizun at Drive Studios, who has worked with the band on all previous releases, the three songs on Cynics are sure to impress and intrigue old fans and new listeners alike. And with cover art by Richard Minino (Horesbites) you can be sure it will look just as good as it sounds.

It seems all the hard work has paid off as The Flatliners will head out on tour again this year in support of Cynics, and soon their third full length album Cavalcade (April 13, 2010 via Fat Wreck) with a handful of American dates, their first trip to Australia, their fourth trip to Europe/UK, and a stint on this summer's Warped Tour. "It's funny to think that this has become our lives." says Cresswell, but that seems to be exactly what's happened and with a new full length slated for 2010 The Flatliners show no signs of slowing down.
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change