Troubadour Jazz Fest, Sarah Renick, Natasha F Agrama, Laura Mace, Rebecka Larsdotter, Patrice Quinn, Kamasi Washington

Troubadour Jazz Fest

Sarah Renick (7:30 PM)

Natasha F Agrama

Laura Mace

Rebecka Larsdotter

Patrice Quinn

Kamasi Washington

Ruslan Sirota

Ian Martin

Tony Austin

Tue, August 23, 2011

7:00 pm

$10.00

This event is all ages

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Sarah Renick - (Set time: 7:30 PM)
Sarah Renick
Natasha F Agrama
Natasha F Agrama
jazz/ pop
Laura Mace
Laura Mace
At only 25, Laura Mace has already traveled worldwide and has shared the stage with some of music’s finest. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA., and attended Citrus College. There, she was accepted into the elite choral group, The Citrus Singers’. She studied classical and musical theatre vocal styles, and toured throughout Europe as a second soprano. While at Citrus, she became the front woman for the college’s renowned Blue Note Swing Orchestra, and entertained thousands from Tokyo to Maui.
In 2007, she made top 100 on American Idol season 7. Soon after, she was accepted into the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA. There, she studied intensely with some of the most accomplished musicians in the country. Only weeks into her first semester at Berklee, Laura Mace was selected to sing as one of five backup singers for the “Women of Rock” concert, where she shared the stage with Meshell Ndegeocello, Joyce Kennedy (Mother’s Finest), Cindy Blackman (Lenny Kravitz), and Felicia Collins (The Late Show).
Other notable performances include singing with Mezzo Soprano Suzanna Guzman (Carmen), Del Casher (guitartist, inventor of the Wah Wah pedal), and John Avila (Oingo Boingo). She is currently touring as one of the “J-Tones” with recording artist James Torme, son of jazz legend Mel Torme.
Rebecka Larsdotter
Rebecka Larsdotter
"Born and raised in Nyhyttan, Sweden. A very small but inspirational spot in the Universe. Apart from Nyhyttan, Rebecka has called Boston, New York, Los Angeles, Ålesund (Norway), and Malmö (Sweden) her home. Presently living in Stockholm, Sweden.

A jazzsinger/songwriter, Rebecka wrote her first song at the age of 2, recorded by her older sister on a tape-recorder of the days. She has since been singing and playing piano, violin, guitar, and finally made Music her full time life in 2002 by taking on a Masters Degree in Music from Örebro and Malmö University of Music.
Upon graduating in 2008, Rebecka moved to the US (Los Angeles, then New York) to pursue her passion for songwriting and performing. She has since been writing, performing, singing, and working as a voice and piano instructor.

This night at Troubadour will be the US-release of Rebecka´s album "Feathers & Concrete" (Prophone Swedish Jazz).
Patrice Quinn
Patrice Quinn
Since joining the LA jazz scene a couple years ago, singer Patrice Quinn has rapidly garnered the respect of many of Los Angeles top musicians, as well as a growing number of fans. All agree they are watching the emergence of an important new jazz artist.

Born and raised in NYC, the daughter of civil rights activists, Patrice cites Nina Simone as her earliest influence. Later, she heard Billie Holiday, then John Coltrane, and more recently Betty Carter and fellow actress turned singer, Abby Lincoln. She began acting professionally at age 15, appearing on Broadway, and at some of the country’s most respected theatres, as well as in many television and film productions.

Patrice continues to act and teaches acting at Los Angeles High School for the Performing Arts all the while cultivating her career in music. She recorded a sweet and swinging version of “Pure Imagination” (from Willie Wonka) on “Cross Hart Jazz Experience” compact disc which is currently receiving radio airplay on jazz stations across the country. Patrice is working on her new live album recording at The Lighthouse, a famous west coast jazz spot.
Kamasi Washington
Kamasi Washington
Life began for Kamasi Washington on February 18, 1981 in Los Angeles, California. In the Washington family music was more of a prerequisite then a privilege. But Kamasi never saw it that way, his love for music began at first sound. His father, Rickey Washington is a professional saxophonist by night and a high school music teacher by day. Kamasi’s mother, Valerie Washington is an accomplished flutist who fell in love with the world of science and became a high school chemistry teacher after her stint as a genetic researcher. By the age of two Kamasi had already began to play the drums and piano, the only thing that kept him away from the wind instruments at that early age was his lack of dental development. He began his exploration into the world of the reeds and brass when he was about seven and his father gave him a clarinet. By the age of twelve Kamasi had found his voice in the form of a tenor saxophone, in fact it was the same saxophone that his father played in high school.

Over the next year Kamasi’s development and devotion to music had out grown his academic environment. So he transferred from The Los Angeles Center of Enriched Studies (one the top academic high schools in the nation) and enrolled into the Hamilton High School Music Academy. It was around this time that Kamasi also joined The Multi School Jazz Band (M.S.J.B.), an assembly of the finest young jazz musicians in Los Angeles County and led by Reginald Andrews the same man that taught Kamasi’s father in high school. Because of the sheer vastness of talent that he was surrounded by it was in The Multi School Jazz Band that inspired Kamasi the most during his high school years. Through M.S.J.B. Kamasi was also able to meet, learn, and create relationships with many of his musical idols such as Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Horse Tapscot, Gerald Wilson, and many others. In Kamasi’s senior year of high school he had the opportunity to compete in the John Coltrane Saxophone competition, in which he received the first place award. As an additional benefit to winning the competition the band of M.S.J.B. members that he assembled to accompany him had such an immediate connection that they decided to stay together and form a group that soon after would be known as “The Young Jazz Giants”.

This fiery group of “Young Giants” wasted no time in spreading their musical wings and flying all over the Los Angeles jazz scene spreading the good news that jazz was still alive and in very good hands. It was during this time that Kamasi became interested in composition and he started writing his own music. Over the next year “The Young Jazz Giants” had really began to develop their own sound and were creating a lot of excitement in their community. After graduating from high school Kamasi began his studies at U.C.L.A. were the facility included some of the finest musicians in the history of Jazz, such as Kenny Burrell, Billy Higgins, Harold Land, Lew Mathews, Garnett Brown, Jeff Clayton, Gerald Wilson, and many others. By the end of his first year at U.C.L.A. Kamasi began performing with many of his professors. In fact he joined Gerald Wilson’s big band and later became the only member of his regular Los Angeles band to be invited to play on his latest album “In My Time” which was recorded in New York. During the summer after Kamasi’s first year at U.C.L.A. the head of a new record label called “Bird Man Records” heard him playing with “The Young Jazz Giants” and became very interested in making an album with the group. So Kamasi recorded his first album it was called The Young Jazz Giants. The completion of the album seemed like the “big break” for “The Young Jazz Giants” but unforeseen delays in the products release ended in the album being released almost two years after it’s completion. Ironically the talent level of the group was far too high for any of the members of the band to stay “ready and waiting” for too long, thus “The Young Jazz Giants” unofficially disbanded. Kamasi began to take interest and became influenced by many other forms of music, from European Classical to Hip Hop. This really opened his mind to the fact that all of the different forms that music takes are equally relevant. From this Kamasi ended up playing with many of the most legendary musicians of the current variety such as Snoop Dog, Raphael Saadiq, and many others. Yet during this time Kamasi despite his newfound respect for all of the forms of music realized that Jazz was still the music that was closest to his heart. So he started a new band that would be able to play the new music that he is creating. The new group is called “The Next Step” and that’s precisely what Kamasi intends on taking.
Ruslan Sirota
Ruslan Sirota
Ruslan was born in Uman, Ukraine to a Jewish family on November 4, 1980. His father, Yefim, who was an active local guitarist, had introduced him to music at an early age. Picking up guitar around the age of four, Ruslan had transitioned to piano around the age of seven. In 1990, his family moved to Israel, where he continued to study piano at the Bat-Yam music school. At approximately 14, Ruslan discovered jazz, instantly showing imminent interest. By the age of 16, he was the "wunderkind" keyboardist for the then-popular Israeli jazz fusion band, "Confusion". With Confusion, he toured Israel and made several appearances at the Red Sea Jazz Festival.

At 18, Ruslan auditioned for the Berklee College of Music, where he received full tuition scholarship, and moved to Boston in January 2000. During his studies at Berklee, Ruslan displayed growing interest in R&B, funk and soul music, playing with local artists and eventually becoming the resident keyboardist in a club called "Wally's Jazz Café". Circa 2004, Ruslan joined the Stanley Clarke band and moved to Los Angeles, thus marking the beginning of his professional career.
Ian Martin
Ian Martin
Blessings and peace from me to you. Thanks for visiting my space. Its opening with the US release my latest CD, The Way, currently on CD BABY, of which Im very excited about. My name is Ian Martin, I was born and raised in Toronto Canada; I would call myself a late bloomer, by musical definition and other wise. From a very young age my father pastured a Pentecostal church, which gave me a great opportunity to fool around with as many instruments I could get my hands on. First came the piano lessons, then drums, then the BASS. I didnt think that it would be the instrument Id make a career playing, actually I didnt think Id have a career in music at all, but thats another story. Growing up in a very religious home, I had to sneak and listen to anything that wasnt gospel, Along with that, Toronto didnt have any black music stations at that time, so my musical exposure to it came from one of 2 ways- either by check out my uncles record collection and tape it, or by listening to the music that was played by the Buffalo NY radio station WBLK and tapping it! However Pop/Rock music was easily accessible at that time, it was on radio everywhere- and if you grew up in Canada in the 70s, theres probably a rocker lying dormant somewhere inside of you At sixteen, I started playing bass and made it my primary instrument. Of course I played in church, but I also played for other gospel groups, choirs. My influences then were, The Richard Smallwood singers, New King James Version, Thompson Community Singers, Walter Hawkins, Edwin Hawkins Music and Arts Seminar Choirs. If any gospel artists came to Toronto, it would be an event in the gospel/church community not to be missed, (this was before internet and CDs. Unlike now distribution of Gospel to Toronto was at best poor). It was also around this time that my best friend bought a Level 42 2LP, called A Physical Presence that record and introduction to the group was the beginning into another aspect of my musical journey. It opened up my thirst for learning about harmony, songwriting/composition and jazz derived music. I think I was hooked from that point on. I always dreamed of going to a school like Berklee, but never really thought that it could be a possibility. Again growing up in Toronto back then, the US (or the States as we called it) was a world that was elusive and mystical. Could I be crazy enough to think I could compete along side American musicians? At that time in the church, to play secular music was very, very taboo. Also in my Jamaican/Canadian culture, a desire for a career in music-other than teaching- was thought of as pure foolishness. At age 19 my parents were commissioned to do missionary work in East Africa, I wasnt sure what the next path was going to be. I had done a few different things up until that point, even at that early age. Finally I decided I was going to go to culinary school, to open a dessert store in the Bahamas with my Aunt (my friends that dont know this story are hysterically laughing!) but my parents said no. I guess they came to grips with the one constant in my live, though the years, music. I know that it wasnt what they wanted, but they knew what made me happy, and against popular church opinion, sent me to Berklee College of Music. They said, Whatever you do, just get your degree so you can teach! I will always be grateful to them for that. So I got my degree in Film Music Composion. It was a very positive experience for me. Learned so much, about music and life in Boston. After school, I tried the NY thing- almost a year commuting between there and Boston. But every time I left the Apple, I felt a sense of relief, (I think thats a pretty good indication that it may not have been the place for me). So I saved some money the following year and moved to Los Angeles in January of 2001. I came extremely close to moving to London, but circumstances arose, I guess I wasnt supposed to move there. Im very happy in LA I think it was the best decision I could have made professionally. Since the migration, Ive had a whirlwind of experiences. Some positive, some not, but all of which were necessary and thankful for. Its the painful ones that test our character, and keep changing us into whom we become. When I think of where Ive come from, its almost overwhelming. I have played with so many incredible musicians in my career, people who I came up listening too, people who Ive idolized, people who have touched me musically (some Ive had crushes on!) In Los Angeles I started to come into my own as a man, flourishing in a whole new direction. I now feel as though Im learning more than I ever have! Im enjoying my life. To all of you, I wish you happiness, and love; keep believing in yourself, keep pushing yourself forward, and most importantly enrich your spirit.
Tony Austin
Tony Austin
Exuding power and originality, drummer Tony Austin has been making music for more than 25 years, working with jazz luminaries such as, Billy Higgins and Charles Lloyd. At 29, Austin is already one of the most recognized and sought-after drummers in Los Angeles. Known for his versatility and dynamic performances, Austin plays the drums professionally in all styles of music. He has shared his talents with a slew of popular artists and groups including Erikah Badu, Salvador Santana, John Avila (Oingo Boingo), Banyan, Rob Wasserman, The Calling, Charles Lloyd, The Monterey Jazz Festival All-Star Big Band, James Torme, and a number of producers and bands that span the globe. A child prodigy, Austin began minting his drumming skills at the International Percussion Academy at age seven. Under the direction of Tom Hixon, Austin shaped his talent and acquired the discipline and professional acumen that launched his bright career. At age 15, Austin burst onto the Los Angeles club scene, and began playing regularly with the jazz group, The Infinity Project. He was then offered a regular spot at the prestigious 5th Street Dick’s jazz club, where he met the late legendary drummer, Billy Higgins. Immediately struck by Austin’s fervent musicianship, Higgins took Austin under his wing and hired him as his “first call” substitute, launching a career that has taken Austin around the world. Topping off his stage shows and studio accomplishments, Austin holds a number of small screen credits. He has performed on a number of television shows including “Studio 60” (NBC), “E-Ring” (NBC), “One on One” (UPN/CW), “What I Like About You” (WB/CW) and “Rhythm and Jam” (NBC). Over the course of his creative journey, Austin has garnered a number of esteemed honors. In 1996, Austin took home the Los Angeles Music Center “Spotlight Award” for Jazz Instrumental, marking the first time a drummer had ever won this competition. He attended the California Institute of the Arts, where he earned a degree in music on the college’s highest awarded scholarship. He was also awarded several Charles (Dolo) Coler scholarships.
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change