"The World's Greatest Living Songwriters Of All Time Tour" feat: Hayes Carll and Bob Schneider

"The World's Greatest Living Songwriters Of All Time Tour" feat: Hayes Carll and Bob Schneider

Hayes Carll (10:15 PM)

BOB SCHNEIDER (9:00 PM)

Thu, June 12, 2014

8:00 pm

$20.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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"The World's Greatest Living Songwriters Of All Time Tour" feat: Hayes Carll and Bob Schneider
"The World's Greatest Living Songwriters Of All Time Tour" feat: Hayes Carll and Bob Schneider
Hayes Carll and Bob Schneider will co-headline The World’s Greatest Living Songwriters Of All Time Tour, which kicks off March 20 in Alexandria, Virginia, at the Birchmere.

The tour will make its way out to the West Coast where it will conclude in Portland on June 28. The ‘World’s Greatest’ tour marks the first time these Texans will share a stage.

Schneider is a musical chameleon of sorts, with a body of work that careens from rock to rap to folk to funk. The Austin, Texas-based artist dropped by American Songwriter last year and played “The Effect,” a track off his new album Burden Of Proof. The story behind the song involves a nose job, MySpace, and a New York City-burlesque club where Lindsay Lohan partied. In other words, vintage Schneider.

Carll, who was the “dream co-writer” for American Songwriter’s Lyric Contest in 2012, works in the tall shadow of the Texas songwriting tradition, though the word’s already spread outside the Lone Star State that he can hold his own as a writer, and that he’s got a way with humor. It wasn’t for nothing that he had a Ray Wylie Hubbard co-write on one of his albums and had a Guy Clark co-write on the album before that. Or that Todd Snider – who’s not a Texan per se, but stands in the writerly lineage of Jerry Jeff Walker, who is one – takes a verse during the shambling hobo ballad “Bottle In My Hand.” Carll is proving more and more that his name belongs with the heavyweights.
Hayes Carll - (Set time: 10:15 PM)
Hayes Carll
Hayes Carll is an odd mix. Wildly literate, utterly slackerly, impossibly romantic, absolutely a slave to the music, the 36-year old Texan is completely committed to the truth and unafraid to skewer pomposity, hypocrisy and small-minded thinking.

In a world of shallow and shallower, where it’s all groove and gloss that might seem a hopeless proposition. However, “Another Like You” Carll’s stereotypes attract duet of polar opposites was American Songwriter’s #1 Song of 2011 and KMAG YOYO was the Americana Music Association’s #1 Album, as well as making Best of Lists for Rolling Stone, SPIN and a New York Times Critics Choice.

But more importantly than the critical acclaim is the way Carll connects with music lovers across genres lines. Playing rock clubs and honkytonks, Bonnaroo, Stones Fest, SXSW and NXNE, he and his band the Gulf Coast Orchestra merge a truculent singer/songwriter take that combines Ray Wylie Hubband’s lean freewheeling squalor with Todd Snider’s brazen Gen Y reality and a healthy dose of love amongst unhealthy people.

“I guess you could say I write degenerate love songs,” Carll says. “That, and songs about people who’re wedged between not much and even less; people who see how hopeless it is and somehow make it work anyway. “And the best kind of irony, sometimes, is applying no irony and letting reality do the work.”

Letting reality do the work has sure worked for the lanky Texan, who walks slow and talks slower. Born in Houston, he went to college at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas – getting a degree in History, then heading back to Crystal Beach to play for
a wild assortment of people either hiding out, hanging on or getting lost in the bars along Texas’ Gulf coast.

After releasing Flowers & Liquor in 2002, Carll was voted the Best New Artist by The Houston Post. He would go on to release Little Rock, on his own Highway 87 label, which became the first self-owned project to the top the Americana charts.

It wasn’t long until Lost Highway, home of Lucinda Williams, Ryan Adams, Van Morrison and the Drive-By Truckers came calling. Trouble in Mind yielded the tongue firmly in cheek “She Left Me For Jesus,” a know-nothing redneck send-up/beer joint anthem somewhere between “You Never Even Called Me By My Name” and “Up Against the Wall.” “Jesus” went on to become the 2008 Americana Music Awards Song of the Year.

All the accolades, all the facts and all the stats are awesome, but they don’t tell the full story. Fiercely individual, Carll’s banged-up take on classic country is honed by the road – sometimes as a man and guitar, sometimes with his scrappy band, but always taking in the vistas and humanity before him.

“It comes down to the songs and the people,” he says. “You write about what you see, the things that cross your mind… and then you wanna get out there and play it back to ‘em. You kinda know how you’re doing when you see how the people respond.”

See above. Hayes Carll is the transmutable jester whose incisive songs and funky beats play as well in shitkicker bars as they do hippie festivals, somewhere as organic as American Public Radio’s “Mountain Stage” concert series and middle America as “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno.” Maybe it’s the influences – Kerouac, Dylan, Guy Clark, John Prine, Hubbard… Maybe it’s the fact that somebody has to say something… Maybe it’s just the fact that some people are born to play…

But for whatever reason, twelve years into a recording career, Hayes Carll shows no signs of having arrived at his creative apex. Each album expands on his already extreme vintage country, extreme thumping bad road boogie, extreme heartbroken ache – and finds new ways to take on the fate of the nation. Whether it’s the GI protagonist in the propulsive title track of KMAG YOYO, the train wreck objet d’amour of “Drunken Poet’s Dream,” also recorded by Hubbard, the road warrior of both “I Got A Gig” and “Little Rock” or the stoner liberal and the uptight Republican vixen of “Another Like You,” Carll paints vivid pictures of humanity as it really is.

Thick-headed. Avaricious. Squalid. Hungry. Angry. Getting by.

Like so many Texans before him, there’s no agony in the ecstasy – just the wonder of capturing the perfect character in the song. When you’re 6 beers down on a 12 pack night, you know Hayes Carll understands. At a time like that – whether in your own backyard or some jam-packed bar – that’s the best kind of friend to have.
BOB SCHNEIDER - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
BOB SCHNEIDER
With the release of his latest album Burden of Proof, Bob Schneider breaks new ground. Exploring loss, lust, love, dark desires and skeptical optimism, Schneider has crafted
lyrically and musically, his most ambitious and sophisticated album to date.

Born in Michigan and raised in Germany, Schneider was playing music and creating art from the time he was four years old. “I was left-handed, but the nuns at my Catholic school forced me to write with my right hand,” Schneider reflects. “But I still like to think of myself as left-handed. I’ve always thought of myself as a round
peg in a square hole sort of person, like I just didn't quite fit in. I was socially awkward and I think that led me to finding solace in imaginary worlds that I would create in my art and music.”

At age ten, Schneider’s father, an opera singer by trade, dressed him in a leisure suit and took him along to gigs where they’d perform jazz standards and other hits from the 1940s-70s. Schneider spent his college years as a fine arts major, but dropped out to move to Austin and pursue a music career after taking to heart the words of singer-songwriter Terry Allen. “I remember him saying ‘If you’re going to do art, drop out of school and start doing your art and living your life ‘cause your degree’s not going to make a difference.”

So Bob Schneider blazed into Austin and has been packing houses and winning over audiences ever since, firmly claiming his place as one of the most sought-after entertainers in the live music capital. Schneider sells out venues coast to coast from New York, Chicago Minneapolis and Baltimore to LA, Seattle, Portland and San Francisco. His live shows are playful and raw, while on stage Schneider commands the room. He’s charismatic and friendly, bantering with his bandmates and heckling the crowd. As he launches into each song with his whole being, the audience is instantly transported, tumbling through the dark recesses of his imagination. Much like Jack White and Ryan Adams, Bob Schneider has mastered the art of keeping his audience on their toes, never knowing what will come next. Schneider dances to the tune of his own drum and the beat changes from album to album. With Burden of Proof, he has elevated his game
once again, creating a brilliant and elegant album. “Some folks might think that I'm taking a big risk musically by getting away from the more easily accessible pop songs of the earlier records,” said Schneider. “But to me it seems like a natural progression that is more subconscious than conscious really.”

Schneider’s songs and albums thrive on the element of surprise, and the tracks on Burden of Proof are no exception, sure to be a crowd favorite. “Unpromised Land”—the first
single off the album—packs all the energy of a Schneider performance into one fierce, rocking anthem. An instant stand out, “Swimming In The Sea,” captures the out-of-body, spine tingling magic of falling in love. Schneider adds, “I love love songs that go against the grain of what it means to be in love and how that's supposed to feel. It's rarely a walk in the park for me and ‘Swimming in the Sea' (which is something that I'm deathly
afraid of) sort of captures the wonder and terror of being in love and not having any control over it all.”

Other highlights include the Leonard Cohen-esque “Digging for Icicles”
highlights Schneider’s vast vocal range, his voice dropping as the song descends into mournful meditations. “The Effect,” gospel-inflected and danceable, evokes Graceland-era Paul Simon. With the deceptively simple “Tomorrow,” the album’s only cover, Schneider offers a stunning re-vision of the classic show tune, raw and unguarded. Amidst the hope-tinged despair of “Wish the Wind Would Blow Me” Schneider tosses out whatamounts to a playground insult, “I wish your mom was ugly/ And your dad was ugly too,” but then deftly twirls it into a disarmingly charming love note, “Then they couldn’t have had a girl/ To be as beautiful as you.”

Nearly every track on Burden of Proof features string arrangements composed by Schneider himself. The album also showcases Schneider’s decades-long creative relationship with the Tosca String Quartet. Schneider first paired with the quartet on “Love is Everywhere,” the hidden track off of his award-winning album I’m Good
Now. At the time, Schneider wrote a string arrangement for the beautifully devastating “Weed Out the Weak.” That fan favorite has finally found a home on Burden of Proof,
positioned amongst sensual charmers, danceable bursts of fire and bounce, and contemplative sojourns. Longtime fans will recognize Schneider’s trademark fusion of eclectic musical styles, innovative compositions, and intricate, emotion-filled lyrics. Schneider croons, drawing listeners in with the promise of romance. Then
the energy shifts, the strings swell, and the songs turn seductively tangy, twisted.
Veering away from the traditional music video model, Schneider is instead honoring the cinematic feel of Burden of Proof by engaging the talents and artistic vision of twelve
film directors. Directors include internationally renowned filmmaker Robert Rodriguez, who shot the video for Schneider’s AAA Radio hit “40 Dogs (Like Romeo and Juliet)” from his 2009 album Lovely Creatures, and award-winning photographer and director Dan Winters, whose photograph and drawings grace Burden of Proof’s cover and liner notes.

Schneider’s artistic exploration is not limited to the stage or the studio. He is also a celebrated sculptor, painter, and poet with two published books of poetry and art and another one forthcoming. With Burden of Proof, Bob Schneider delivers a much-heralded explosive addition to his already expansive artistic canon, a work of sophisticated craftsmanship and a wild ride to boot.
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change