Christina Perri

Christina Perri (10:00 PM)

HONEYHONEY (9:05 PM)

Sarah Ault (8:30 PM)

Thu, August 11, 2011

8:00 pm

$15.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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Christina Perri - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Christina Perri
At just 23, Christina Perri has already lived a handful of lives. She's toured the world as an assistant to a rock band, spent a year at a prestigious university, became a wife and then an ex-wife, produced popular music videos, made olive oil in Italy and even served as a fashionista barrista in Beverly Hills. The whole while, music had been tapping her on the shoulder, trying to lead her down a path as a musician. It seems that fate grew tired of this shoulder-tapping approach as well and went for an old fashioned sucker punch.

On June 30th, a raw, defiant break-up song that Perri had written called "Jar of Hearts" aired on Fox's So You Think You Can Dance as a backdrop to a memorable piece choreographed by Stacey Tookey. The song struck a chord with viewers, who began downloading it from iTunes in droves, sending "Jar of Hearts" into the Top 10 on the iTunes Pop chart and into the Top 15 on the Overall chart overnight. Impressed, SYTYCD's producers invited Perri to play the song live on the show two weeks later.

Following Perri's stripped-down piano performance on July 15th, "Jar of Hearts" continued its meteoric rise. After landing at No. 25 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and at No. 1 on Amazon's digital singles chart, the track sold 200,000 downloads in three weeks. Suddenly a hot property, Perri signed a record deal with Atlantic Records and is in the studio finishing up her debut album, with an eye toward a late fall release. She will also hit the road for a handful of shows in late September to perform with Jason Mraz, one of her all-time favorite artists.

"While all of this was happening, I barely slept," Perri says, "because I was afraid it was just a dream; that I'd wake up and none of it would be real. One minute I didn't exist in the music world and the next minute I did. It has been so unbelievable."

Though she's a newcomer to the pop charts, Perri has actually been preparing for this moment since she was a child. The daughter of hairdressers (whom she describes as "not musical, though my mom can whistle in many octaves and both my parents play the accordion"), Perri first sang in public at her Holy Communion at age six. Piano lessons began at age 8, followed by musical theater from age 11. At 9, her piano teacher "fired" her (as she puts it), because "I would change the endings to all the songs because I didn't like the way they were written. I liked my version better." Perri picked up a guitar and taught herself to play from watching VHS tapes of Blind Melon (whose guitarist, Christopher Thorn, recently sent her a congratulatory email via MySpace).

Perri was in London working as a gofer for her brother's band Silvertide when she got word that she had been accepted to Philadelphia's prestigious University of the Arts with a sizeable scholarship. She attended for a year, but took a leave of absence to visit her father's extensive family in Italy. "I was 19 and I needed to soul search," she says. "I was still writing music, but I didn't know what I wanted to do with my life." She spent the summer learning how to make olive oil and wine, living with seventeen different family members in seventeen different cities.

Still searching, Perri moved to Los Angeles with a suitcase and a guitar. "I didn't know anyone," she says. "I did a lot of crying and a lot of songwriting." On her fourth day in Los Angeles, Perri met a guy, and, carried away with the romance of it, eloped four months later. The couple launched a production company and Perri worked as its executive producer, creating music videos and commercials. She was 22. "In theory, it all sounds perfect," she admits. "I had the house, the job, the dogs. It was the coolest life ever, but it was somebody else's life."

Perri and her husband split and she decided to recommit herself to being a singer and a songwriter. "I locked myself in the house and wrote music," she says. She also posted YouTube videos of herself performing her own songs, as well as covers, and shared her struggles in her uniquely humorous way. A video of one of her original compositions, "Tragedy," caught the attention of Bill Silva Management (which represents Jason Mraz, James Morrison, and others), who signed on to represent her.

And so began Perri's charmed odyssey.

Perri feels that "Jar of Hearts" has connected because, "on a basic level, everyone has had this experience with a person who broke their heart. I'm just telling my story in a very real and direct way. This kind of slapped the crap out of everyone's hearts," she says with a laugh.

The songs Perri is recording for her debut album are all about love. She excels at setting dark, tumultuous emotions to stunning, pretty melodies, something Fiona Apple and Alanis Morissette excelled at back in the day. "I would love to bring that back for a younger generation," Perri says. "I had them to listen to when I was young, but girls today don't really have their Fiona or Alanis. And writing about love and heartbreak is just who I am. I've tried so hard to write about other things, but ultimately this is what comes out of me. I have zero capability to do anything that is inauthentic to who I am."
HONEYHONEY - (Set time: 9:05 PM)
HONEYHONEY
The third full-length effort from L.A.-based duo HONEYHONEY, 3 is an album born from fascination with the sweet and the sleazy, light and dark, danger and magic. Working with Dave Cobb (the producer behind Jason Isbell’s Southeastern and Sturgill Simpson’s Metamodern Sounds in Country Music), lead singer/banjo player/violinist Suzanne Santo and vocalist/guitarist Ben Jaffe twist their gritty, harmony-driven brand of Southern-flavored rock & roll through tales of lost souls, broken boys, girls with gold in their spit. Equal parts inward-looking and endlessly curious, the two songwriters also take a mirror to their own experience in lust and heartache and never shy away from revealing the messy truth. And whether they rattle or soothe or joyfully inspire, HONEYHONEY instill each song with a straight-from-the-gut honesty and elegance of storytelling that make 3 both cathartic and electrifying.

The follow-up to 2011’s Billy Jack (named one of the top albums of the year by American Songwriter and hailed for finding “the common pop thread between alt. country, spaghetti western soundtracks and swampy blues” by Paste), 3 was recorded in HONEYHONEY’s one-time home of Nashville with a lineup of locals that includes musicians like Robbie Turner (a pedal steel guitarist who’s played with Johnny Cash and The Highwaymen). And while the album finds HONEYHONEY offering their most finely crafted melodies and richly textured sound to date, the band also embodies a loose and scrappy energy drawn out with some help from Cobb. “Dave never let me obsess over my vocals,” says Santo, whose sultry but tender voice intensifies the intimacy of each track. “He’d just be like, ‘Nope, that was raw, we got it, we’re good.’” Adds Jaffe: “He didn’t really allow us to overthink anything, which is great for what we do—the more barriers you can remove to get to the soul of it, the better.”

Throughout 3, that soul gets channeled into songs both gorgeously unhinged (such as “Mary Rich,” an epic R&B number that amps up the moody tension of its lyrics with some sublime and frenetic guitar work) and quietly piercing (a la “Burned Me Out,” a wistful ballad about “the loss of idealism, and how that can be really painful but also beautiful,” according to Santo). On the brash and bluesy “Bad People,” HONEYHONEY seesaw between scorn (“Tried your best to be your worst/You must like it that you’re cursed”) and empathy (“We all got some darkness up our sleeve”) in their meditation on the origins of ugly behavior in everyday life. Built on a lilting and lovely string-laced arrangement, “Father’s Daughter” devastates in just two lines at the song’s achingly delivered chorus (“You know I’m in hot water/If I’m my father’s daughter”). And in the one-two punch of the brooding “Numb It” and the steamy, groove-heavy “Sweet Thing,” 3 looks at the torment and bliss that can come from giving yourself over to pure desire.

For HONEYHONEY, the balance of sophistication and heart that the duo strikes on 3 has much to do with their closeness as songwriting collaborators. “Writing is about trust—trust in yourself and trust in your partner—and with us there’s a level of trust that you can only get from knowing someone for years and years,” says Jaffe. Forming the band in 2006, Santo and Jaffe first crossed paths at a costume party (she was a cheetah, he was Ralph Macchio in The Karate Kid), felt an instant creative connection, and soon started making music together. Although Jaffe learned to play violin and drums as a little kid in western Massachusetts and joined a local jazz band in high school, the Ohio-bred Santo initially pursued work in acting and didn’t think of music as a possible path until early adulthood. “I was new to L.A. and I’d just broken up with my first love,” she recalls. “I started writing these awful songs but I just kept going with it, and after a while it hit me that this was what I was supposed to do with my life.” Making their full-length debut with 2008’s First Rodeo, HONEYHONEY saw their sophomore album Billy Jack climb to #15 on Billboard’s Folk Albums chart and soon began earning praise from the likes of The Onion’s A.V. Club and LA Weekly.

Though Santo and Jaffe consider their continued growth as songwriters to be the lifeblood of the band, their live show also makes for a major element of the HONEYHONEY experience. “The reason we write songs is to express something real, and being able to engage with people directly the way we do onstage is a really important part of that,” Jaffe says. Fueled by their easy chemistry and between-song banter, the duo’s stage presence adds a whole new level of spirit and passion to their sound. “If there’s any kind of goal to what we’re doing, it’s to shake things up for the people listening,” says Santo. “Whether they need to dance or get happy or get angry or whatever, we can make that happen for them. We’ll make you cry and then make you laugh in under ten minutes.”
Sarah Ault - (Set time: 8:30 PM)
Sarah Ault
Sarah Ault is a Los Angeles born and raised singer/songwriter. While her gender, and instrument of choice, which is Piano, associates her with a group of artists such as Fiona Apple, Regina Spektor and Norah Jones, she refuses to be contained into such a specific genre. Her untamed time signatures and powerhouse vocals set her apart from others of her type. Unapologetically, she tears through her songs, telling stories of lovers lost and found, lessons learned and journeys unknown.
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change