Bill Callahan, Michael Chapman

Bill Callahan (10:00 PM)

Michael Chapman (9:00 PM)

Thu, June 16, 2011

8:00 pm

$15.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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Bill Callahan - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Bill Callahan
Bill Callahan showed up on our porch in 1991 saying his name was Smog.
We took him in and he has been with us ever since. We think you will feel the same way about him once you look into his hungry eyes. Over the years he reminisced about "Cold Blooded Old Times" and told us to "Dress Sexy At My Funeral," releasing over twenty records as Smog and then, unfettered, as Bill Callahan. He is a recording studio guru, a tastefully rampant singer-songwriter, a heartthrob, a visual artist, a statesman for the times and an author.

After a couple albums recorded at home in the early 90's, he began recording in studios and teamed up with potent individuals such as musician/arranger Jim O'Rourke. His output has been constant for two decades and his tours have become larger and more impressive. Bill's songs have been featured in films such as High Fidelity, Dead Man's Shoes, and Youth in Revolt, all of which feature Zach Galifinakis (or should). Artists as diverse as Gil Scott-Heron, Flaming Lips and Cat Power have recorded his songs.

In 2007 Bill Callahan dropped the pseudonym and begin releasing his albums under his own name.

2009 saw the orchestrated juggernaut Sometimes I Wish We Were an Eagle. The album received terrific reviews across the board and then it took off, becoming a fixture on top-10 lists of 2009, including 2nd best album in MOJO (the 2nd best magazine in England!).

A live LP came next, Rough Travel for a Rare Thing, which was a critic's choice review in the NY Times. This must mean he's a force on stage, yes yes?

Summer of 2010, Callahan published his first work of fiction, Letters To Emma Bowlcut. The dapper novelette features sixty-two letters from a nameless protagonist to a woman he saw at a party. The book is cutting, discursive, tender and laced with punch lines. Funny ones.
Callahan has performed readings from the book for audiences in New York, London and Chicago, among other cities.

As we edge ever closer to the fateful year 2012, Bill Callahan jumps the gun with his own personal Apocalypse (04/19/11). This is important work. Brace yourself. Apocalypse is comi
Michael Chapman - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Michael Chapman
The guitar and voice of Michael Chapman first became known on the Cornish Folk Circuit in 1967. Playing a blend of atmospheric and autobiographical material he established a reputation for intensity and innovation. Signed to EMI's Harvest label he recorded a quartet of classic albums. LPs like 'Rainmaker' and 'Wrecked Again' defined the melancholic observer role Michael was to make his own, mixing intricate guitar instrumentals with a full band sound. The influential album 'Fully Qualified Survivor', featuring the guitar of Mick Ronson and Rick (Steeleye Span) Kemp's bass, was John Peel's favourite album of 1970. 'Survivor' featured the Chapman 'hit', "Postcards of Scarborough" , a characteristically tenderly sour song recounting the feelings of nostalgia and regret.

A lively and accomplished improviser, Michael gained a reputation for re-working material, both before an audience and on record. Songs were seen as standards, themes to be explored, extended and varied on stage and in the studio. The Don Nix produced 'Savage Amusement' featured versions of the Chapman songs "Shuffleboat River Farewell" and "It Didn't Work Out". Different musicians and a different sound breathed new life into earlier material, showing Michael to be a jazz musician in spirit if not in sound. 'The Man Who Hated Mornings' showed the respect Michael commanded among musicians with supporting performances from Andy Latimer of Camel, Keef Hartley and violinist Johnny Van Derek.

1978 brought the release of 'Playing Guitar The Easy Way', a guitar tutorial record that explained in simple terms, methods of playing the guitar using 12 different instrumental pieces each with a different open tuning. The critically well received albums, 'Life On The Ceiling' and 'Looking For Eleven', showed that Michael had fully absorbed elements of rock as he had done folk during the '60's, to produce a hybrid that mixed folk, jazz phrasing, rock and elements of what became known as New Age Music.

In response to public demand Michael recorded a solo album 'Almost Alone' presenting the relaxed eclectic mix that was a Chapman club gig. The '80's saw Michael back with Rick Kemp. Touring as a duo they released the live album 'Original Owners', whose version of "Shuffleboat River Farewell", stripped back to guitar and bass, showed that old dogs could teach new tricks. Anyone hearing the anger of the newer material, coupled with the volume and energy of the Chapman Kemp band Savage Amusement, formed in the mid '80's, was left in no doubt that here was an elder statesman growing more acid, rather than mellower with age. After a period of reflection and lower profile releases, Michael captured the mood of the time with his '87 album Heartbeat, a groundbreaking thematic album featuring a continuous 38 minute piece of music. This was an ambition made possible by the advent of CDs

Experiments with sequencers and sampling on the 90's track "Geordies Down The Road", an anthem to the death of employment in the North East, assaulted the listener with foundry atmospherics and industrial guitars, showing that Michael wasn't standing still. The albums 'Still Making Rain' and '95's 'Navigation' presented a man whose world-weary voice, given a patina by life and hard living, delivered sensitive, emotional songs. While aware of his past, reinterpreting his hit "Postcards of Scarborough", Michael looked to the future. The playing was more considered than ever before. Fewer notes and space for music to breathe, gave songs like "The Mallard" and "It Ain't So" an almost hymn like intensity. 1995 also saw the publishing of Michael's first novel 'Firewater Dreams', a thinly veiled autobiography, which fleshed out some of his highly personal songs and explored his themes of regret, travel and loneliness. Reviews of his album 'Navigation' show the high regard for Michael Chapman, Mojo Magazine 11/95 'Twenty one albums and he is still amazing', Q 12/95 '**** (four stars out of a possible five) and his best album in years.
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change