JASON ISBELL & The 400 UNIT w/ special guest Maria Taylor

JASON ISBELL & The 400 UNIT w/ special guest Maria Taylor (10:00 PM)

Maria Taylor (9:00 PM)

Doc Dailey (8:30 PM)

Sun, June 19, 2011

8:00 pm

$15.00

This event is all ages

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JASON ISBELL & The 400 UNIT w/ special guest Maria Taylor - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
JASON ISBELL & The 400 UNIT w/ special guest Maria Taylor
Here We Rest: The first motto of Jason Isbell’s home state got changed in the early part of last century to a Latin phrase that translates to “we dare defend our rights”. What starts out as peaceful idyll descends into a defensive posture with the threat of bellicosity just beneath the surface. That’s what tough times will do to a people.
Jason Isbell’s home is northern Alabama, a region that has been hit especially hard in the recent economic downturn. “The mood here has darkened considerably,” says Jason. “There is a real culture around Muscle Shoals, Florence and Sheffield of family, of people taking care of their own. When people lose their ability to do that, their sense of self dissolves. It has a devastating effect on personal relationships, and mine were not immune.”
The characters that populate Here We Rest are wrung out. In “Alabama Pines”, the protagonist has found himself on the outside of the life he once knew. He is living in a small room and in a state of emotional disrepair - estranged from the woman that he loved, as well as friends (“I don’t even need a name anymore/When no one calls it out, it kinda vanishes away”). He is beginning to recognize that his own remoteness and obstinacy has played a large part in his current state of affairs, and longs for “someone to take him home through those Alabama pines.” He’s not quite clear how to get back there himself.
Place plays a prominent role in the songs on Here We Rest. Jason was home considerably more this year, having toured less in 2010. After being on the road for 200 or more days for more years than he cares to count, he stayed home mostly to write and record this album. “I could probably live anywhere, but I love it here,” says Jason. “Being home is very different than being on the road. You learn a certain discipline that has its entire context within the touring lifestyle. This was the first time that I’ve been an adult in my own house, in my own community. Plus on the road, you have your whiskey waiting for you when you get to the gig. Here you have to go get it.”
Spending all that time around his hometown, he could reacquaint himself with the locale and immerse himself with the rhythms of life in northern Alabama. “Being able to sit on my stool at D.P.’s, a bar in the building I live in, talk to my friends, and hear the problems that they have helped inform some of these songs.” Sometimes, people in that bar grow tired of hearing others bitch when they themselves were on the edge, and it would sometimes lead to fights. “Save It For Sunday” grew out of one of those experiences. A bar patron, unsure of the solidity of his relationship, tells his fellow bar patron that “we got cares of our own,” and suggesting that the he save his sorrows for his “choir and everyone” at his church.
Our military draws disproportionately from areas that are economically depressed, and northern Alabama has more than its share of those that have served, not only out of a deep sense of patriotism, but also because of shrinking employment options. In “Tour Of Duty,” Jason writes of a soldier that is coming home from war for the last time, and will try, more than likely in vain, to assimilate back into civilian life. His soldier is voracious for normalcy. He admits to not knowing or caring how his loved one has changed and dreams of eating chicken wings and starting a family. But there’s a subtle sense that this craving for normalcy will cause him to suppress the damage done to him during wartime: “I promise not to bore you with my stories/I promise not to scare you with my tears/I never would exaggerate the glory/I’ll seem so satisfied here.” Seeming satisfied is not being satisfied, but it’s the best he can imagine.
The time off from the road also had an effect on the musical sensibilities that shaped this album. Jason was able to collaborate with more artists (he played on the latest albums by Justin Townes Earle, Middle Brother, Abby Owens and Coy Bowles), which broadened his ideas about how he could present his own music. “I always felt like certain things, like my guitar playing, had to be perfect, and when I was in the studio environment, I couldmake sure that it was. But looking back, it might have robbed the music of a certain amount of spontaneity. There’s more out and out rock and roll guitar on this album.” In addition, Jason embraces a more acoustic, more traditional country music sound to a degree that he had been reluctant to in the past. “When you come from Alabama, that country soul music is in the water. I’ve always loved it and been proud of it, but there’s always been this sense of proving that you were capable of more than just that. If I was going to create an album that gave listeners a sense of the place, I felt it was important to let the songs go there if they wanted to.”
The time at home has also had an effect on the lyrical point of view of the album. Because of the subject material of the album, Jason wrote from a more empathetic point of view than ever before. “I tried more than ever to get out from behind my own eyes and see things through others’ eyes,” he says. In “We’ve Met,” Jason puts himself in the place of a person that was left behind in their hometown and, with a tinge of bitterness, remembers the one who went away better than they are remembered (Jason says, “I’m quite sure that I’ve been the person that didn’t remember before, and I hate it”).
As with the last album, the 400 Unit shines. Keyboard player Derry deBorja, guitarist Browan Lollar, bassist Jimbo Hart and drummer Chad Gamble play with either the ferocity or subtlety that the songs call for. Having played over four hundred shows together as a band have given Jason and the guys an innate sense of one another; they are gelling into a truly great band.
The original state motto was written by Alexander Beaufort Meek, a former Alabama attorney general, in his 1842 essay outlining the history of the state. The last lines of that history say: “We have shown the condition and character of our population; the Red Sea of trials and suffering through which they had to pass; the fragile bark that floated in triumph through the perils of the tide....From such rude and troublous beginnings, the present population of Alabama, acquired the right to say, ‘Here we rest!’” The times are indeed rude and troublous again in Alabama, and Jason Isbell’s inspired album offers both documentation and the same fervent hope that his people will find their rest.
Maria Taylor - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Maria Taylor
Am I in it? is it now? Is it what comes after this life?

I’ve lived so many lives within this life.

I grew up singing and writing songs as early as I can remember. I was writing words before I knew words, making them up and singing them.

I started a band when I was 15 with my best friend, Orenda Fink. We named it Punchanella. Later we grew into a pop band and called ourselves Little Red Rocket. As we honed our craft, we also found our music to be cathartic and a way to cope with the death of someone close to us. Our music changed as it mirrored our lives and with the change we became Azure Ray. We came into ourselves as Azure Ray.

But as time equals growth and change, after many records and many, many years together I started my solo career. I loved the freedom I had to explore different genres within a single record. Every record I released since then has been a reflection of where life has taken me.

Fast forward to 2016.

A move back to California and a husband and two children later I’ve found myself looking at my favorite release of all of my work. I rummaged through my life, taking parts of my past lives and intertwining them with my current life. I’ve imagined my life beyond what is now. I’ve taken all that I’ve learned both musically and lyrically (with the help of my incredibly talented friends) and put it into this record. I kept asking myself, “If I die tomorrow, what would I want my last record to say?”

I teamed up with one of my favorite songwriters and producers, Nik Freitas, to co-produce this record. I love his music and what he brought to these songs. I called in help from many of my super-talented friends and family. I balanced my femininity with beautiful male backing vocals. “If Only” features Conor Oberst. “It Will Find Me” and “Pretty Scars” feature Joshua Radin. There are also appearances from Nik Freitas, Macey Taylor, Jake Bellows, Louis Schefano and the female exception, Morgan Nagler. One of my dearest friends and favorite poets, Brad Armstrong, was my lyric coach for this record. Writing a record and raising two kids has many challenges. I would find myself in ruts with the lyrics and Brad would help me with different approaches and steer my brain away from the obvious. I even co-wrote lyrics to “There’s Only Now” with one of my favorite lyricists and friends, Morgan Nagler. My connection to this record was also the impetus for self-releasing under the my own label, “Flower Moon Records.”

In The Next Life sums up my past, my present, and my future. I’m so fortunate to have this life to write about, these friends to write it with.

“As if you were on fire from within. The moon lives in the lining of your skin.” - Pablo Neruda
Doc Dailey - (Set time: 8:30 PM)
Doc Dailey
Doc Dailey has been writing and performing original music around the South for the last few years. From Muscle Shoals, AL, his sound has been described as Americana, Indie-Folk, and Gritty Southern Pop. Sometimes he flies solo, sometimes he’s accompanied by others, and sometimes there’s a full band in tow.

In December 2005, Dailey self-released a 6-song debut, The Family EP, on his own Southern Discipline Recording Company label.

After several recording attempts and countless shows around the Southeastern U.S., the time was right to get back into the studio. Dailey approached sound engineer Ben Tanner, formerly of FAME Recording Studio, and basic tracks were laid down at Wishbone Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL in October of 2009, for what would become Victims, Enemies, & Old Friends.

In the months leading up to tracking, Dailey assembled a full-time backing band consisting of, long-time accompanist, Jon Berry on banjo, Ben Stedman and Kyle Minckler (That Hideous Strength) on bass guitar and drums, and Amber Murray and Nathan Pitts (The Bear) on vocals and pedal steel guitar.

Overdubs and additional tracks were recorded during the next couple of months at Big Cedar in Cypress Inn, TN and Wildwood Park Recording in Florence, AL featuring Danley Murner (mandolin), Kate Tayler Hunt (violin, viola, and cello), Anna Grott (vocals) and guest appearances by Jamie Barrier (The Pine Hill Haints) on fiddle and Browan Lollar (Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit) on guitar. Dailey and Tanner co-produced the record with Tanner also adding keyboards to several tracks.

Doc Dailey & Magnolia Devil released Victims, Enemies, & Old Friends on October, 5th 2010 by Dailey’s Southern Discipline Recording Company.

Songs from Victims, Enemies, & Old Friends have been getting airtime on several college stations around the Southeast as well a being featured on Franny Thomas’s Sirius/XM show, Your Roots Are Showing, on The Loft.
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change