Youngblood Hawke

Youngblood Hawke (10:15 PM)

The Mowgli's (9:15 PM)

Zak Waters (8:30 PM)

Thu, March 7, 2013

8:00 pm

$15

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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Youngblood Hawke - (Set time: 10:15 PM)
Youngblood Hawke
Sometimes, you’ll shine the brightest during your darkest hour.

That’s exactly what longtime friends multi-instrumentalist Simon Katz and singer Sam Martin came to realize when they commenced writing songs for what would become Youngblood Hawke’s self-titled debut EP. Katz and Martin had seen critical acclaim and worldwide success as founding members of Iglu & Hartly. However, after a rousing performance at Coachella 2010, the group dissolved due to a creative clash.

“We went from massive success to nothing over the course of two years,” recalls Katz. “We didn’t like the direction the band was going in, and we wanted to do something closer to our hearts. We had to start over. The only thing you have in times like that is hope.”

With hope in their hearts, the duo began feverishly penning songs in Katz’s Los Angeles studio that summer. Galvanized and reinvigorated, they emerged from that sweaty, air conditioner-less room with over one-hundred ideas and a fresh perspective altogether. Martin admits, “We didn’t begin by saying, ‘We’re going to start a new band’. It was more of an outlet to express ourselves. It was the most natural thing I’ve ever done. There was no plan.”

There didn’t need to be a plan because their songs were so anthemic and uplifting. In early 2011, they began releasing material and booking local gigs around Los Angeles. Rounded out by Katz’s childhood best friend Tasso on guitar, Alice on backup vocals and live percussion, and Iglu & Hartly touring drummer Nik, the band hit the Roxy for its first show.

Based on the strength of the tunes and a completely organic buzz, they sold out a string of nights at Silverlake hotspot, Satellite. Soon, Universal Republic Records contacted them and offered a deal. Their first five-song EP for the label drops August 14, 2012, and it will be followed up by a full-length a year later.

Martin describes Youngblood Hawke’s inimitable sound best. “It has elements of pop, rock, indie, dance, and even a little hip hop.”

The first single “We Come Running” encapsulates that sentiment. A propulsive beat builds alongside shimmering bells as Martin’s massive refrain soars. “It’s like a personal message to the band,” the vocalist reveals. “It announces that if we work our asses off, they’re going to hear the sound when we come running. We’re going to get our chance.”

Elsewhere, “Dannyboy” is a tribute to a friend who tragically passed, while “Rootless” finds freedom in starting anew over an echoing riff and huge chorus. “It was one of the first tracks Sam and I wrote together during that first summer,” says Katz. “We didn’t have a foundation anymore after our last project. We were feeling rootless, but we were free.”

The quintet’s moniker also reflects the glorious serendipity at the heart of its journey. Nodding to the Herman Wouk novel of the same name, it’s utterly a propos.

“I was looking for a new book to read,” remembers Martin. “My dad called me out of the blue, and he was like, ‘Your uncle’s favorite book is Youngblood Hawke. You have to read it’. From the first page, it really hit me. It’s about a Kentucky mountain boy who wants to become a writer so he moves to New York. Simon and I moved from Colorado where we were going to college and immersed ourselves in this crazy L.A. landscape. It really resonated with us as a story about an artist finding his way.”

At the end of the day, these artists have found their way in Youngblood Hawke, and the path is brighter than ever. “We’ve seen the bottom and the top,” concludes Katz. “Things get bad, and then they get good again. The music is about being hopeful and never giving up.”
The Mowgli's - (Set time: 9:15 PM)
The Mowgli's
One of the most exciting things in all of music is discovering a band early on, following them throughout their career and watching that moment as they come into their own. For California alt-pop band THE MOWGLI'S that moment is two-fold on their superb third album "Where'd Your Weekend Go?," due fall 2016. They not only get to share their songwriting growth with fans who have followed the band since they formed in 2010, the band got to experience it themselves.

Ask singers and principal songwriters KATIE EARL, JOSH HOGAN and COLIN DIEDEN the secret to the band's growth on this new album and they will all say it came from within. "Involving the whole band in the writing process was a hugely important factor in this new record. When everyone's there you just have more brains, more minds," HOGAN says. EARL echoes this: "A lot of our songs start with one or two people's ideas and the band puts their mark on them later. This time we spent a great deal of time in the room together as the six of us, building many songs from the ground up."

The results of incorporating band members whose tastes run from "musical theater to black metal to pop" according to HOGAN, are an incredibly diverse collection of songs that run like a musical time machine through the best of the past four decades of music.

From the jangly folk/pop of the Sixties-infused "Arms & Legs,"and the groovy Seventies feel of "Monster" to the 80's inspired "Bad Thing" and anthemic "Spiderweb" this latest collection is a testament to songwriting.

One recent song released from the LP, "Spacin Out" is one of the first tracks that came together from jamming in the studio. "'Spacin Out' has a kind of jazzy feel, but it's very Mowgli's, "says HOGAN. "In the bridge we cut to a seven/eight time signature -- it's little things like that come from the fact we have some really amazing musicians in our band." In addition to Dieden, Earl and Hogan, the band is rounded out by MATTHEW DI PANNI (bass), DAVID APPELBAUM (keys) and ANDY WARREN (drums).

The band has been previewing some of the new songs on recent tour dates with great success. "'Monster,' it's just crazy the reaction we've been getting from audiences," DIEDEN says. "It's an immediately familiar-sounding song." They're also playing the album's first released track, "Freakin' Me Out," a thoroughly engaging and winning blend of summer-like pop, R&B and soul that is one of the band's favorite songs since their first LP's debut single "San Francisco."

HOGAN, EARL and DIEDEN freely admit that the success of "San Francisco," which led to TV appearances on The Tonight Show, Conan and Jimmy Kimmel, sold-out tours and, arguably most excitedly, a prominent role in the San Francisco Giants' World Series title in 2012 (the team played it regularly on their way to the championship) had influence on the sophomore record, Kids in Love.

Making that second LP, they felt rushed and pressured by often conflicting outside opinions. But as the cliché goes, "That which does not kill you...." HOGAN credits that experience with motivating the band to take a stand against external forces on this collection. "With this record we were very clear about doing it ourselves and we just said, 'Give us a little time and we'll write you a sick record,'"

They backed it up, showing growth, not only musically, but lyrically as well. "These songs are about really digging deeper into personal issues because there are only so many times you can sing about loving each other. It's not that we have moved past that message necessarily, it's that we want to explore other concepts," HOGAN says. "There's one song on the record, 'Last Forever,' that was meant for the second album but we ended up reworking it a lot. It's a song I was writing going through a breakup and life changes, with a line in the song that says, 'If we lose it altogether, maybe love will last forever.' That, to me, is the opposite of what the Mowgli's would normally say. But I hope people can connect with that sentiment."

Helping them channel all these changes into the growth on the new album is producer Mike Green (Pierce The Veil, All Time Low, The Wanted), who the band was so confident they wanted to work with that they revised their whole recording schedule to accommodate his availability.

To EARL, it was absolutely the right call. "We're a lot of really big personalities, a lot of energy and Mike has this really calming, relaxed vibe that's much different from any of the rest of ours. And he works so fast that nothing gets lost or overthought," she says. "It just felt like the right fit. We had never worked with him before, so we did a trial run, and just clicked."

DIEDEN agrees. "Mike has a really good sense of contemporary popular music but I think he's very aware of how to make ideas sound different and unique. He also understands what people want to hear right now, which is a great balancing act." The band also collaborated with U.K. producer Rob Ellmore on "Automatic" and "Bad Thing," the LP's first radio single. "'Bad Thing'' says Dieden, "is a song about the kind of person who feels so good they're dangerous. The kind of person you want to run away from and pull closer to you simultaneously. The song also makes ya wanna shake your butt with your pals."

All of these elements -- Green, the band's renewed independence and collaborative process -- have weaved together seamlessly to make The Mowgli's third record a career album, that moment where the band steps to the next level as artists. HOGAN and EARL hear it proudly as they listen to the album all the way through.

"It's been really cool to learn and experience everything we have and now, us as people, we're very close and I think we're just at our best," HOGAN says.

"This record is the truest representation of who we are, not just as individuals, but as a band," EARL says. It's the sound of collaboration, it's the sound of listening to and working with each other in ways that we've never done before. I'm really, really proud of every moment. Everybody shines more than they've ever shone. To me, it feels like a rebirth for us."
Zak Waters - (Set time: 8:30 PM)
Zak Waters
Triple threat Zak Waters always leaves a mark. Ever since he first formally began performing in high school, the Los Angeles singer, songwriter, and producer never failed to make a lasting impression on his audience, and it’s always three-pronged. Unlike his contemporaries. He can do it all from constructing a track to writing the lyrics to performing it live with his band or in a DJ set.
However, he's always been driving his own music. In 2011, he broke on to the scene with his independent debut EP, New Normal. He served as both the featured writer and singer on Madeon's hit dance single "The City," which hit #1 on Hype Machine and peaked at #4 on the Billboard Dance Chart, where it stayed for nine months. Meanwhile, his single with Candyland, "Not Coming Down," topped the Beatport charts as #1 track for two weeks. He's performed on AXS Live, Last Call With Carson Daly, and on KIIS FM. Meanwhile, he’s not only been personally sought out by Flo Rida and Benny Benassi for their upcoming 2014 tracks, but also by the likes of legendary songwriter Diane Warren and Atlantic Records artist Francisco for his production talents. He's produced official remixes alongside Benny Benassi, R3hab, Pharrel Williams for All-American Rejects, Adam Lambert, and Foxy Shazam Moreover, famed Los Angeles venue The Satellite in Silver L ake tapped him for a high-profile residency as well in September 2013.
His impact is about to expand immensely with the release of his forthcoming full-length debut album, Lip Service—available exclusively on Spotify via a unique deal in September 2013. Shimmying between soulful funk savoir faire and fresh dance floor-ready pop, he cultivates an immediately seductive, soaring, and shimmering style of his own.
He puts it best though, "My music is definitely meant to make people dance. I like to think of it as disco at its core. There are elements of EDM and R&B at the same time. You could call it neo-funk-pop. I'll take that as mine."
His personal panache punctuates the first single "Penelope." The song tells a cheeky little tale that's as vivid as it is vivacious.
" I kept listening to the track and going back to a vision of a young kid obsessed with his baby sitter and wondering where she's at now," he explains. "I think we all had that babysitter. My friend's sitter was so hot. She was 'Penelope' for me. Now, you wonder, 'Would she look at me differently now that I'm grown up?'"
Elsewhere, “Dear John” featuring Audra Mae is a smart rumination on breaking up, while “Over You” examines the some darker moments post-relationship. Waters tapes into real tangible emotion, extending beyond the feel good pop.”
There's one pervasive thread throughout. "It's all about wanting to have fun," he concludes. "The majority of my songs are upbeat. They're meant to be the soundtrack to somebody's wild night. I love when somebody tells me I made it onto their workout or sex mix. If I can encapsulate a time for the listener, I feel like I will never be forgotten.”
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change