twenty I one I pilots

twenty I one I pilots (9:15 PM)

New Politics (8:15 PM)

Echosmith (7:30 PM)

Wed, February 20, 2013

7:00 pm

adv tix $10.00 / day of show tix $12.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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twenty I one I pilots - (Set time: 9:15 PM)
twenty I one I pilots
In its purest form music acts as a conduit of self-expression that's free from the conventions of society and that spirit of fearlessness lies at the core of twenty | one | pilots, a group whose musical vision is completely their own. Over the past few years the duo of frontman Tyler Joseph and drummer Josh Dun have built a hardcore following that seems primed to reach a fever pitch with the release of their Fueled By Ramen debut Vessel. "The first song I ever played on the piano was my own. I never took any lessons,"
Joseph responds when asked about his musical background. "I looked at the piano and realized that music was a way of being able to say something; the phrase I always use
is that 'music is a vessel' and that's where the album title comes from." Before long Joseph was writing and recording his own demos in his basement and twenty | one |
pilots was born. The Columbus, Ohio-based band started out like most acts but instead of aimlessly touring they concentrated on their hometown base and before long they were selling out huge local venues like Newport Music Hall despite the fact they only had two selfrecorded
releases available. "Every show we play our hearts out because where we come from you have to grab people's attention and make sure that they never forget you," Joseph says. "In our case we were able to build up a fanbase - one that walked with us to grab the attention of the music industry outside of our hometown eventually opening up the doors that have led to so many opportunities to take our music around the world on what is an amazing journey".
The duo's ability to build up this local base was confirmed when the band sold out the 2,300-capacity LC Pavilion last April to announce that they were signing to Fueled By
Ramen, after being courted by over a dozen labels. That's right, there was no fancy marketing or gimmickry that lead to twenty | one | pilots' rise, it was based solely on the
organic relationship they cultivated with their fans via their music, live performances and online content. "To our fans we say we never got our big break, you created our big
break. Thank you," Joseph says. For Vessel the band entered a real studio for the first time ever with Grammy nominated
producer Greg Wells (Weezer, Adele) to craft an album which merges elements of hiphop, indie rock and punk in a way that's so seamless that you'll be rapping along one
minute and caught up in a lush orchestral line on a song like "Car Radio " in the next minute. "We're not trying to consciously do something different but we've just never
emulated any other bands" Joseph explains. "We've never fit into any particular scene so we figured we would just make our own."
From the impossibly catchy groove of "Semi-Automatic" to the high-energy hip-hop of "Holding On To You" and the ambient electronic experimentation of "Trees," Vessel is a
complex collection of songs that shows why twenty | one | pilots are the latest addition to Fueled By Ramen's extremely selective roster. "'Ode To Sleep' is a song I'm really
proud of because it's really odd when it comes to structure; it challenges the listener," Joseph explains. "Ultimately I think those are the types of moments that make our fans
really connect to our music." Sounding so unique was never an obstacle for twenty | one | pilots early on, in fact it has
been a trait that has endeared them to their fans. "I don't think there are a lot of bands that can play a hardcore show one night or a hip-hop show the next night and know that
it will work," Dun explains, adding that the band's live performances have always been integral to the act. "We want our fans to leave all of their problems at the door and
immerse themselves in the music, the moment, when we perform live," he adds. "In the end it's a giant release for everybody."
"We went from not having a glimmer of hope to all of the sudden having the opportunity to leave Columbus and make a record and that's something that we're never going to
take for granted," Joseph summarizes. "The songs on Vessel represent who we are and now we get to take this collection of songs, this body of work, to the world," he continues. "It is not a short term thing for us, we're planning on being around for a long
time."
New Politics - (Set time: 8:15 PM)
New Politics
New Politics’ self-titled debut, which came on via RCA in 2010, was centered on a singular motto. The Denmark trio, who uprooted their lives and relocated to Williamsburg after signing with the label, based everything on the notion of just saying “Fuck it.” The phrase wasn’t about apathy, it was about doing what felt right and making the sort of music they wanted to make. It worked: New Politics yielded raucous hit single “Yeah Yeah Yeah” and the band embarked on tour for nearly two years with the likes of 30 Seconds To Mars and Neon Trees, enrapturing fans with their intensely dynamic live shows, bolstered by David’s impressive breakdancing skills. The band appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live and Fuel TV’s The Daily Habit, and earned scores of press, including accolades from Alternative Press and [add one more publication?]. Doing what felt right to the band evolved into a big album with a bigger response.

When it came time to pen a follow-up to their formative album, New Politics hit a few roadblocks. David and Soren had hardly paused between the momentum of New Politics and this new disc, titled A Bad Girl In Harlem, jumping into writing within a week of getting off tour with the Dirty Heads in the spring of 2011. But they quickly realized that there was no plan or outline for the next album, and suddenly both musicians were single and living in Brooklyn, a fact that illuminated just how far they were from home.

Homesickness and culture shock set in, and New Politics were forced to grapple with their present musical identity. “I don’t think any of us had really considered that we now would be doing a second album and the whole culture shock of coming over here was hitting us,” Soren says. “The first album was a punk album and this one had to be taken to a whole new level, but we didn’t actually know what that level was.”

The process of writing A Bad Girl In Harlem proved long and arduous, but ultimately fruitful. The band came out of it with over 60 demos, many inspired by David’s new single life. The musicians embraced a greater variety of musical styles, drawing influence equally from punk rock and pop music. The recording process coincided with the songwriting, and in fact a few of the disc’s final tracks feature the original demo vocals, which resonate with a more genuine flair than the subsequent takes.

The songs’ lyrics, too, were rooted in the musicians’ shifting lives and experiences. “Harlem,” the album’s first single, was inspired a fling David had with a girl from Spanish Harlem, an area he never thought he’d visit. The throbbing rock number captures a boisterous party vibe and marked a turning point in the band’s writing process for A Bad Girl In Harlem. “It came at a point when we were all like ‘What the fuck is going on?’” Soren notes. “And the song came from us having fun. We were still a little afraid of changing but we just said ‘Fuck it.’ We realized we had nothing to lose and could do whatever we wanted.”

So it turned out New Politics’ old motto could be their new motto, even as the band shifted and evolved. The rest of the album, culled from the pile of demos, is notably varied, and follows in this raucous sensibility, even on standout “Stuck On You,” an emotional piano ballad that reveals the group’s introspective side. The punk aesthetic from New Politics lingers, but regardless of musical style Soren and David were mostly interested in capturing sincere moments in equally genuine music. “Everything has to come from the heart,” David says. “Realizing onstage that you can do anything and if it’s honest and from the heart, the rest will follow. Everything will follow. It’s been really cool realizing that and bringing it into the album.”

“I feel that we have never been this focused,” Soren adds. “It’s more than us being these crazy, jumping around musicians and just going with whatever flows. We have more of a mission. We went through something hard and now we’re stronger than ever. I think that’s the most important thing – it’s actually been a great experience to fall down and rise again.”
Echosmith - (Set time: 7:30 PM)
Echosmith
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change