Walk Off The Earth w/Special Guests

Walk Off The Earth w/Special Guests

Walk Off The Earth (10:10 PM)

Selah Sue (9:15 PM)

The Mowgli's (8:30 PM)

Fri, November 30, 2012

8:00 pm

$0.00 - $20.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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Walk Off The Earth - (Set time: 10:10 PM)
Walk Off The Earth
With a name like "Walk Off The Earth," you might say this band sounds otherworldly. In fact, it's very much grounded in reality.

"We wanted to come up with a name that would make people forget about their problems, not worry about everyday issues," says Gianni Luminati. "And walk off the earth with the music."

Let's meet the band: There's Gianni, a dynamic producer and multi-contributor. Gianni has been obsessed with all aspects of music for pretty much his whole life. He started on the pots and pans (a make-shift drum kit) at age 3, while his mother played the piano by his side. Over the years he's picked up different instruments, while also learning about engineering and producing. He has developed an unconventional vision and sound for the band, and music in general, that is one of the major driving forces behind WOTE's determination to become one of the most unique bands of all time. Gianni creates his own opportunities through sheer perseverance. "If someone tells me something is not possible, I make it possible."

Singer and multi-instrumentalist Sarah Blackwood began playing music when her father showed her a few chords on a guitar at the age of 12. Soon she began writing and producing her own music. Being the female vocal in the band, Sarah adds a dynamic that will captivate you. She has played in bands that have taken her to over 30 countries, and with her experience and infatuation with music, she was a perfect match for WOTE's work ethic and motivation. It didn't take long for her to join in full throttle. Sarah also creates most of the band's artwork, though she'll laugh if you ask her if she's had any formal graphic arts training.

Marshall stands out with a raspy yet silky voice that is truly unique. He is as adept at manipulating trumpet valves as he is guitar strings. Marshall's very first instrument was the mouth harp at age 3, given to him by his grandpa, and it was the first thing that steered him towards a future full of music. Now he is an accomplished blues harp player, in addition to mastering a myriad of other instruments. Marshall adds an incredible amount of charm to the band's sound. When he wasn't immersing himself in music, Marshall somehow found the time to study hard in college, where he earned a Bachelor in Economics.

Keyboardist Taylor is better known as "beard guy" for his mysterious facial hair. And mysterious he is. However, do not be fooled by his YouTube persona. Taylor began his musical adventure at the age of 4. Being classically trained on piano, it is clear from any live show that Taylor's skills hold up to many of the greats. He is also known to rock the trumpet and perhaps a glockenspiel every now and then.

Then there's Joel Cassady on drums, who recently left college to learn from the school of life by playing music. He is the most computer savvy member of the band. When it comes to drumming, he is incredibly unique and captivating. And every once in a while, Joel will step out from behind his drum kit and throw a left-handed curve ball your way, so watch out!

WOTE formed 6 years ago in Burlington, Ontario, Canada, releasing two full length albums and several singles independently. The band began creating low-budget YouTube videos that quickly resulted in an ever-growing fan base all over the world.

The band is no stranger to attracting fans, or "Wote-lings," with their unique homemade videos. They hit upon something special when they decided to shoot their videos all in one take, originally a necessity in order to film and edit their videos quickly. The single-take videos became their signature, and to date 90% of the videos they make are done in one take, even though their editing skills have developed over the years.

The band's axis shifted in 2012 when a cover of Gotye's "Somebody That I Used to Know" went viral (and then some) on YouTube. Recorded and filmed in Gianni's kitchen the day after a New Year's Eve party, the now-infamous video shows all five members playing, in unconventional ways, one guitar. The video was shot in one take using a Canon 3Ti named "Tamera." ("She's the only other girl in the band," says Sarah. "We call her Tammy for short").

They uploaded the video, thinking it wasn't necessarily their best work. But they woke up to inboxes overflowing with hundreds of emails, endless voicemail messages and the news they were being talked about on radio stations around the world.

"There was just a vibe in the air," says Sarah. "And we kept saying, 'Something's happening. Something really cool is happening.'"

The song earned 4 million views in one day, and won praise from celebrities like Russell Crowe, Justin Timberlake, Coldplay, Jason Alexander and Adele. Even Gotye offered his congratulations. The sudden spotlight snowballed into a plethora of viewers exploring their YouTube channel and enjoying the 60+ videos/songs they have posted since 2010.

The band quickly broke away from the path of a typical viral YouTube sensation, and it is clear that WOTE are much more than a novel talking dog. Walk Off The Earth now has over 300,000,000 views in total on their channel. And they certainly have a lot to share with the world.

Soon Ellen DeGeneres came calling, and then the band made appearances at Lollapalooza, Summer Sonic Festival in Tokyo, Japan, as well as a string of sold out shows in Europe, keeping the band on the go. But they were determined more than ever to keep the buzz going, and WOTE got down to work in Gianni's studio in Burlington, recording their debut album for Columbia Records, called "R.E.V.O." The title is an acronym for "Realize Every Victory Outright." For the band, it also represents a revolution, a call for listeners to stay positive and keep striving for their goals. A way of life. Their way of life.

"Speeches," blends the gorgeous signature harmonies of WOTE's three vocalists with a measure of urgency provided by the ukulele and trumpet. The track "Red Hands" was the first song penned by all members of the group since solidifying their current line-up and it is downright anthemic. The drumbastic chorus has such thrust it'll wake every cell in your body and have you thinking, "this is a band that wants to be heard."

"'Red Hands' is about taking responsibility for your actions and not always trying to blame other people when something goes wrong," says Gianni.

In keeping with WOTE's commitment to visual counterparts for their songs, the band will be releasing several videos for the tracks on "R.E.V.O." One of the first videos to debut is for "Red Hands," and was directed by Ellis Bahl and the band. The video was, in true WOTE form, done in one take, and is an incredible vision that touches on everything the band is about stylistically. It is completely idiosyncratic, and will stun you as you watch over and over again, studying every move and truly appreciating how amazing the strategy and production really is. It required the musicians to perform parts of the song backwards, completely rearranged and at different speeds, all to be pieced back together at the end for a seamless rendition of the song while the band is walking through a warehouse. But the video was no sweat really for five artists who can switch instruments as easily as a chameleon changes colours.

Watch any of WOTE's videos and you'll see such sights as a ukulele falling from the sky into Sarah's hands, or Taylor playing piano with his feet. And Gianni can find the musical merit in just about any household item -- a broom to sweep, a wall to tap.

"There are no rules in this band." says Gianni.
Selah Sue - (Set time: 9:15 PM)
Selah Sue
Selah Sue was not destined to become an artist. “I grew up in a really little town in Belgium, and none of my family was into music,” reveals the twenty‐one year old, with refreshing sincerity. “As a kid, I wanted to be a ballerina. I danced from the age of six to twelve”. Even without romanticising it, her story is like a fairy tale. It’s the story of a young musician who ignores her fate, and pours her anxieties into her songs and her guitar. “I had all these worries and depressions that I wrote down, it was a way of structuring my thoughts”. She turns her doubts into soul, funk and reggae melodies, trying hard to be worthy of her idols, Lauryn Hill, Erykah Badu and Bob Marley. She sings in local clubs on the weekend and attends high school during the week. She records in home‐studios, at friends houses, and publishes drafts of her songs on Myspace, without a thought of making a career in music. What happens next seems almost unreal. Thousands of fans respond to her on the net, attracting the attention of professionals, and the interest of Because Music, which eventually leads to a record deal for the young musician. Then Farhot (Nneka) and Patrice take on the production of her first album. Meshell Ndegeocello stays with her in the studio for two days to produce the track “Mommy”. Cee‐Lo Green agrees to accompany her on a duet and ends up asking her to put the track (“Please”) on his own album. And, last but not least, last autumn Prince offered her a coveted support slot at his show in Antwerp, Belgium. To put it in a nutshell, in just two years, Selah Sue has fulfilled her dreams. To keep her grounded, she has insisted on keeping the songs she wrote during her teens for her debut album. It’s a way of reminding the world that she has not been unfairly spoiled by destiny and that before Prince, Cee‐Lo Green, radio play and incredible press, there was just a teenage girl, with her guitar, who was chosen spontaneously by fans on the net. For example, her first single “Raggamuffin” is one of her oldest songs and was viewed more than a million times online. “This track symbolizes me” she explains. “It shows my soulful and singing side, but also my hard side, between rap and ragga. When my manager asked me who I wanted to work with, I said Farhot straight away, as I’m a fan of Nneka. But I also wanted an intimate, dark, melodious record, with light and lively beats. Farhot is crazy about digital sounds and Patrice, who I know well, was the ideal man for the melodious part. They were my two accomplices in the studio.” Her first album is ambitious. It is a smart melting pot between electric rock, organic hip‐hop and soul‐funk. The twelve tracks shift from poignant ballads like “Mommy” to wilder styles like “Crazy Vibes”. Like Janelle Monae, M.I.A. or Aloe Blacc, Selah Sue belongs to a new generation for whom music has no boundaries. Selah Sue will tour her new record in the Spring.


Even without romanticising it, her story is like a fairy tale. It's the story of a young musician who ignores her fate, and ...pours her anxieties into her songs and her guitar. "I had all these worries and depressions that I wrote down, it was a way of structuring my thoughts".

She turns her doubts into soul, funk and reggae melodies, trying hard to be worthy of her idols, Lauryn Hill, Erykah Badu and Bob Marley. She sings in local clubs on the weekend and attends high school during the week. She records in home-studios, at friends houses, and publishes drafts of her songs on Myspace, without a thought of making a career in music.

What happens next seems almost unreal. Thousands of fans respond to her on the net, attracting the attention of professionals, and the interest of Because Music, which eventually leads to a record deal for the young musician. Then Farhot (Nneka) and Patrice take on the production of her first album. Meshell Ndegeocello stays with her in the studio for two days to produce the track "Mommy". Cee-Lo Green agrees to accompany her on a duet and ends up asking her to put the track ("Please") on his own album. And, last but not least, last autumn Prince offered her a coveted support slot at his show in Antwerp, Belgium.

To put it in a nutshell, in just two years, Selah Sue has fulfilled her dreams. To keep her grounded, she has insisted on keeping the songs she wrote during her teens for her debut album. It's a way of reminding the world that she has not been unfairly spoiled by destiny and that before Prince, Cee-Lo Green, radio play and incredible press, there was just a teenage girl, with her guitar, who was chosen spontaneously by fans on the net.

For example, her first single "Raggamuffin" is one of her oldest songs and was viewed more than a million times online. "This track symbolizes me" she explains. "It shows my soulful and singing side, but also my hard side, between rap and ragga. When my manager asked me who I wanted to work with, I said Farhot straight away, as I'm a fan of Nneka. But I also wanted an intimate, dark, melodious record, with light and lively beats. Farhot is crazy about digital sounds and Patrice, who I know well, was the ideal man for the melodious part. They were my two accomplices in the studio."

Her first album is ambitious. It is a smart melting pot between electric rock, organic hip-hop and soul-funk. The eleven tracks shift from poignant ballads like "Mommy" to wilder styles like "Crazy Vibes". Like Janelle Monae, M.I.A. or Aloe Blacc, Selah Sue belongs to a new generation for whom music has no boundaries. Selah Sue will tour her new record in the Spring.
The Mowgli's - (Set time: 8:30 PM)
The Mowgli's
One of the most exciting things in all of music is discovering a band early on, following them throughout their career and watching that moment as they come into their own. For California alt-pop band THE MOWGLI'S that moment is two-fold on their superb third album "Where'd Your Weekend Go?," due fall 2016. They not only get to share their songwriting growth with fans who have followed the band since they formed in 2010, the band got to experience it themselves.

Ask singers and principal songwriters KATIE EARL, JOSH HOGAN and COLIN DIEDEN the secret to the band's growth on this new album and they will all say it came from within. "Involving the whole band in the writing process was a hugely important factor in this new record. When everyone's there you just have more brains, more minds," HOGAN says. EARL echoes this: "A lot of our songs start with one or two people's ideas and the band puts their mark on them later. This time we spent a great deal of time in the room together as the six of us, building many songs from the ground up."

The results of incorporating band members whose tastes run from "musical theater to black metal to pop" according to HOGAN, are an incredibly diverse collection of songs that run like a musical time machine through the best of the past four decades of music.

From the jangly folk/pop of the Sixties-infused "Arms & Legs,"and the groovy Seventies feel of "Monster" to the 80's inspired "Bad Thing" and anthemic "Spiderweb" this latest collection is a testament to songwriting.

One recent song released from the LP, "Spacin Out" is one of the first tracks that came together from jamming in the studio. "'Spacin Out' has a kind of jazzy feel, but it's very Mowgli's, "says HOGAN. "In the bridge we cut to a seven/eight time signature -- it's little things like that come from the fact we have some really amazing musicians in our band." In addition to Dieden, Earl and Hogan, the band is rounded out by MATTHEW DI PANNI (bass), DAVID APPELBAUM (keys) and ANDY WARREN (drums).

The band has been previewing some of the new songs on recent tour dates with great success. "'Monster,' it's just crazy the reaction we've been getting from audiences," DIEDEN says. "It's an immediately familiar-sounding song." They're also playing the album's first released track, "Freakin' Me Out," a thoroughly engaging and winning blend of summer-like pop, R&B and soul that is one of the band's favorite songs since their first LP's debut single "San Francisco."

HOGAN, EARL and DIEDEN freely admit that the success of "San Francisco," which led to TV appearances on The Tonight Show, Conan and Jimmy Kimmel, sold-out tours and, arguably most excitedly, a prominent role in the San Francisco Giants' World Series title in 2012 (the team played it regularly on their way to the championship) had influence on the sophomore record, Kids in Love.

Making that second LP, they felt rushed and pressured by often conflicting outside opinions. But as the cliché goes, "That which does not kill you...." HOGAN credits that experience with motivating the band to take a stand against external forces on this collection. "With this record we were very clear about doing it ourselves and we just said, 'Give us a little time and we'll write you a sick record,'"

They backed it up, showing growth, not only musically, but lyrically as well. "These songs are about really digging deeper into personal issues because there are only so many times you can sing about loving each other. It's not that we have moved past that message necessarily, it's that we want to explore other concepts," HOGAN says. "There's one song on the record, 'Last Forever,' that was meant for the second album but we ended up reworking it a lot. It's a song I was writing going through a breakup and life changes, with a line in the song that says, 'If we lose it altogether, maybe love will last forever.' That, to me, is the opposite of what the Mowgli's would normally say. But I hope people can connect with that sentiment."

Helping them channel all these changes into the growth on the new album is producer Mike Green (Pierce The Veil, All Time Low, The Wanted), who the band was so confident they wanted to work with that they revised their whole recording schedule to accommodate his availability.

To EARL, it was absolutely the right call. "We're a lot of really big personalities, a lot of energy and Mike has this really calming, relaxed vibe that's much different from any of the rest of ours. And he works so fast that nothing gets lost or overthought," she says. "It just felt like the right fit. We had never worked with him before, so we did a trial run, and just clicked."

DIEDEN agrees. "Mike has a really good sense of contemporary popular music but I think he's very aware of how to make ideas sound different and unique. He also understands what people want to hear right now, which is a great balancing act." The band also collaborated with U.K. producer Rob Ellmore on "Automatic" and "Bad Thing," the LP's first radio single. "'Bad Thing'' says Dieden, "is a song about the kind of person who feels so good they're dangerous. The kind of person you want to run away from and pull closer to you simultaneously. The song also makes ya wanna shake your butt with your pals."

All of these elements -- Green, the band's renewed independence and collaborative process -- have weaved together seamlessly to make The Mowgli's third record a career album, that moment where the band steps to the next level as artists. HOGAN and EARL hear it proudly as they listen to the album all the way through.

"It's been really cool to learn and experience everything we have and now, us as people, we're very close and I think we're just at our best," HOGAN says.

"This record is the truest representation of who we are, not just as individuals, but as a band," EARL says. It's the sound of collaboration, it's the sound of listening to and working with each other in ways that we've never done before. I'm really, really proud of every moment. Everybody shines more than they've ever shone. To me, it feels like a rebirth for us."
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change