Joseph Arthur

Joseph Arthur (9:30 PM)

Reuben Hollebon (8:30 PM)

Mon, September 12, 2016

8:00 pm

$0.00 - $20.00

Event date changed to Monday, September 12, 2016. All previously purchased tickets honored for the new date. If you cannot attend the new date, please contact support.ticketfly.com no later than July 15, 2016. 

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Joseph Arthur - (Set time: 9:30 PM)
Joseph Arthur
For every song Joseph Arthur has released in a critically acclaimed, Grammy-nominated career that has spanned nine full-length albums and 11 EPs, he’s probably kept three others in the vault for safekeeping. Indeed, Arthur has been known to start working on a new album — or two — while simultaneously trying to finish another.

It was amid this abundance of riches that the Brooklyn-by way of Ohio-native began molding a collection of music under a single narrative thread: The Ballad of Boogie Christ, described by Arthur as “a fictionalized character loosely based on my own journey.”

At first, it was a song here or there, or a set of lyrics with no accompanying music. Then, those songs would get recorded and set aside. They’d get re-recorded and revised. They’d start to make sense in relation to their brothers and sisters, and then they wouldn’t. And pretty soon, more than half-a-decade had flown by and Boogie Christ was no closer to coherency.

“For some reason, I’ve been avoiding finishing this record for a long time,” Arthur says with a laugh. “It’s been an albatross around my neck. I don’t know why, but it has.”

Yet despite its labored birth, The Ballad of Boogie Christ has defied the odds to become another essential cornerstone of Arthur’s robust discography. Encompassing sessions put to tape in upstate New York, Los Angeles, Minneapolis and Arthur’s own Brooklyn studio, the 11-song album showcases the artist’s signature rich storytelling set to a diverse range of rock’n’roll.

“I don’t know that there’s a beginning, middle and end to the story, but there are definitely experiences, situations and perspectives that point in those directions,” says Arthur. “I wanted to let the listener fill in some of the blanks without telling the whole story in a straight-ahead way.”

The album begins with the surprising orchestral pop of “Currency of Love”, on which Arthur unveils a passionate croon unlike any vocal performance he’s ever given. From there, Boogie Christ offers epic affirmations on overcoming addiction (the seven-minute closer “All the Old Heroes”), anthems of open-hearted solidarity (“Wait for Your Lights”, “It’s OK To Be Young/Gone”) and the kinds of slow-burning narratives (“Famous Friends Along the Coast”, “I Used To Know How to Walk on Water” and a reimagined, hymn-like version of his standout, “I Miss the Zoo”) that have won Arthur a legion of fans around the globe.

Songs like “Black Flowers”, “I Used To Know How to Walk on Water” and the title cut were recorded several years ago with help from the Band’s legendary keyboardist Garth Hudson and bassist Catherine Popper (Ryan Adams, Jack White), while newer additions to the track list such as “Currency of Love” and “Saint of Impossible Causes” were crafted in Los Angeles with assistance from Chris Seefried (Fitz & the Tantrums, Lana Del Rey). Among the other guests on Boogie Christ are Ben Harper (Arthur’s bandmate in Fistful of Mercy), session drummer extraordinaire Jim Keltner, Joan As Policewoman leader Joan Wasser and composer Paul Cantelon (Oliver Stone’s W., Julian Schnabel’s The Diving Bell & the Butterfly).

“There are certain moments on the album that are just pop music and sugary,” Arthur says. “I didn’t want it to be this diatribe of heaviness, and it had been like that sometimes. I definitely wanted moments of relief within it, where you just get a good jam.”

At the center of the project is the autobiographical “King of Cleveland,” a classic story song that connects Boogie Christ the character with Arthur the flesh-and-blood artist. On it, the narrator apprentices alongside a big fish in a small pond, “playing blues in the back seats, from biker bars to limousines” — much like Arthur did in his early professional career in Northeast Ohio. Says Arthur, “He’s just starting to live the life he’s imagined, playing roots boogie in the real America — Ohio.”

“I’ve heard David Bowie talk about how Ziggy Stardust and some other records were the beginnings of screenplays that he just never finished,” he says. “I could really see this becoming something deeper and bigger than just an album.

“Chuck Prophet reminded me that there’s always the Great American Novel,” he continues. “And that really stuck in my head about Boogie Christ. That’s what I’ve been wanting to achieve with this album. He encouraged me that it was okay to dream big.”
Reuben Hollebon - (Set time: 8:30 PM)
Reuben Hollebon
After several years engineering and producing other people's records, musician Reuben Hollebon is finally releasing his debut album. Evoking Elliott Smith, The National, Tim Buckley and Grizzly Bear, Terminal Nostalgia is a burnished, bristling collection that showcases Hollebon's striking, weightless falsetto, and the production nous he's honed over a decade of working in studios. His lyrics tackle the afterlife, the power of nature, and the multiplicity of selves that lurk within us all.
Terminal Nostalgia is mostly self-produced, and Hollebon says he likes to play the studio like an instrument. However, despite all his wayward experimentation, Terminal Nostalgia is incredibly coherent. It doesn't sound like Bon Iver'sFor Emma Forever Ago, but it conjures a similarly assured sense of place and atmosphere. Opener “Haystacks” is a tale of a lost boy from Hollebon's youth who got caught setting a field on fire, which sets the tone for the album's sound – a kind of dusky, kindling crackle made up of acoustic guitar, distant ocean washes, and stormy percussion. It sounds even more arresting live, where he's joined by a four-piece band. The sound is deeply tied to his Norfolk upbringing, which he learned to appreciate. “When I was 26, I stood in front of a Turner painting – those colours were a large inspiration. I realised how magnificent things can be, how much power there is in that. In spite of growing up in a dawdling '70s housing sort of area, Norfolk is a beautiful place, and I can't help but be made up of that.”
Venue Information:
Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90069
http://www.troubadour.com/

All lineups and times subject to change